Region

Eurasia

The Midnight Train to Moscow

Joseph Schottenfeld and George Butler follow one of the world's largest migrations: workers traveling by train from Tajikistan to Moscow. 

Inside Russia’s Propaganda Machine

For years, the Kremlin and the media it controls have waged a multifaceted disinformation campaign inside Russia and pointed at its perceived adversaries, including the U.S.

Paula Bronstein on Afghanistan’s War Wounded

“You’re making compromises all the time because of the security issues. But this is why I did this update, because the idea was to bring attention to a story that right now people aren’t really paying attention to.” — Paula Bronstein

Tajikistan: How Green Was My Valley

The president of Tajikistan once called Mirzasho Akobirov the country's best orchard keeper. Now, Akobirov would like others in Tajikistan to follow his example, rather than migrate to Russia.

In Nepal, Where Have All the Men Gone?

As young adult men leave for foreign employment opportunities, how is a Nepali village transforming? And how is the absence of young adult men affecting those who are left behind?

September 04, 2017

Russia: Women Hit Hard by HIV/AIDS

Anna Nemtsova, Sophia Jones

The HIV/AIDS epidemic is at a tipping point in Russia, where an estimated 1-1.5 million people are HIV positive and the Kremlin has long rejected international assistance. Women are being left behind.

December 23, 2016

Refugee Boom and Bust: A Global Gold Rush

Malia Politzer, Emily Kassie

From smugglers in Agadez, to factory owners in Turkey, to the Italian and Nigerian mafias in Italy, and small business owners in Greece, people making a killing off the global migrant crisis.

November 20, 2015

The Return of Cold War Nuclear Fears

Rachel Oswald

Ongoing U.S.-Russia tensions around Ukraine have spilled over into the nuclear weapons realm, putting at risk decades of post-Cold War effort to foster nuclear predictability, stability, and safety.

November 04, 2015

Profile of Selahattin Demirtas

Christopher de Bellaigue

Selahattin Demirtas guided his party to 59 seats in the Turkish general election of Nov. 1. He must now defend its peaceful message against the possibility of civil war.

March 12, 2015

Child Survivors of War Learn Nonviolence, Pluralism, Hope

Lauren Gelfond Feldinger

Syrian and other international volunteers travel at their own expense to Syrian refugee neighborhoods to teach war-traumatized children that they are not "the lost generation" but future peace-makers.

November 17, 2014

Russia: Anti-Gay Policies and a Surge in HIV

Nora FitzGerald

Russia's government crackdown on the LGBT community is fueling an alarming increase in the AIDS epidemic in Russia. New infections increased by 10 percent in 2013.

October 03, 2014

The Black Sea: An Environmental Crisis

Dimiter Kenarov

The Black Sea region has become the focus of heated geopolitical contention, but local environmental issues remain underreported and poorly understood.

September 11, 2014

Syrian Refugees in Turkey

Selin Thomas

Boston University student fellow Selin Thomas documents people on the margins as she tells stories of the Syrian conflict.

August 27, 2014

Istanbul: Housing for the Displaced

Paul Short

Few world cities match the speed of Istanbul’s urban transformation. As new mass housing projects, business districts and suspended bridges dot the city’s horizon, the urban poor are being displaced.

December 27, 2013

Atlas of Pentecostalism

Bregtje van der Haak, Richard Vijgen

An interactive visual guide to the world's most rapidly growing religious movement.

July 30, 2013

A Melting Arctic

Yves Eudes, Olivier Truc

Global warming is happening faster around the Arctic Ocean than anywhere else. To adjust to this new climate, local communities must change the way they live and work – for better and for worse.

Meet Paul Salopek

Journalist Paul Salopek is preparing to leave on a journey that will take seven years and span 39 countries—and he is doing it all on foot.

This Week: Living on the Margins

This week: Economic despair drives migration to Moscow, the Catholic Church's response to Duterte's killings, and PBS NewsHour revisits reporting on the US's nuclear arsenal.

Russia: Could Streams Amplify Global Warming?

On a skiff in remote Siberia scientists measure bubbles from a river in hopes of understanding how global waterways may be contributing to carbon emissions.

Russia: Fire Above the Arctic Circle

The arctic is facing a new threat: Fire. As the flames intensify, scientists want to know if fire will increase carbon emissions and accelerate global warming.

Migration and Refugees Lesson Plans

The following lesson plans for middle school teachers, high school teachers and college professors introduce reporting connected to migration and the experiences of refugees.

Museum of Current Crises

This lesson plan outlines a project that allows students the opportunity to connect with a contemporary crisis somewhere in the world.

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