May 12, 2015 / Jeneen Interlandi | Science & Story
Jeneen Interlandi
Photographs from the Vigtelep settlement in Miskolc, Hungary, where residents are facing eviction.
May 7, 2015 / Jeneen Interlandi | Science & Story
Jeneen Interlandi
The Roma Holocaust, known as the Porajmos, claimed hundreds of thousands of lives during WWII. The atrocity against the Roma people was not formally recognized until 1982.
March 23, 2015 /
Tom Hundley, Jeneen Interlandi
Can mapping neural pathways help us make friends with our enemies?
Image by Jeneen Interlandi. Hungary, 2014.
March 21, 2015
Jeneen Interlandi
A string of courtroom victories have promised to bring an end to school segregation for Roma students. But implementing those legal decisions has proven as difficult as changing cultural attitudes.
February 25, 2015
Yana Paskova
Twenty-five years after the fall of the Berlin Wall, photojournalist Yana Paskova takes a look at the state of democracy in her home country, former Soviet satellite, Bulgaria.
February 25, 2015
Misha Friedman
Photographer Misha Friedman traveled to Crimea to find out how Russian annexation affected the vulnerable people there.
February 25, 2015 / Untold Stories
Holly Pickett, Joanna Kakissis
Some Syrians who came to Russia with work visas now find themselves trapped. With little chance of gaining legal status, they face exploitation from employers and police.
February 25, 2015 / WBEZ
Dimiter Kenarov
Pulitzer Center grantee Dimiter Kenarov is interviewed by WBEZ's Worldview about his project "Ukraine: Crimea under Siege."
February 25, 2015 / Untold Stories
Yana Paskova
Despite the establishment of democracy in Bulgaria, communism still lives in people's minds.
February 18, 2015 / Roads & Kingdoms
Misha Friedman
Roads and Kingdoms interviews Pulitzer Center grantee photojournalist on his project "Official Homophobia in Russia."
February 16, 2015
Tom Hundley, Dimiter Kenarov
Crimea is no longer celebrating its reunion with Russia.
February 8, 2015 / Foreign Policy
Dimiter Kenarov
No tourists, frightened Tatars, and Russians have taken all the jobs. Welcome to Crimea in winter.
January 19, 2015 / Foreign Policy
Dimiter Kenarov
Ukrainians thought that, post-Maidan, their country would start to look more like Europe. But for members of the LGBT community, things may have even gotten worse.

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