May 21, 2015 /
Sim Chi Yin
China’s deadly mining accidents hit the international news headlines frequently. But the country's top occupational disease, pneumoconiosis, kills three times as many miners each year.
May 20, 2015 / Yale Environment 360
Karim Chrobog
In the second of two videos on food waste, filmmaker Karim Chrobog travels to Seoul, South Korea, which has implemented a high-tech initiative that has dramatically reduced its waste.
May 19, 2015 / Untold Stories
Tomas van Houtryve
What is life like inside North Korea? Nine escapees share their experiences in this portrait gallery.
April 9, 2015 / The Irrawaddy
Spike Johnson
Burma’s army has forcibly recruited teenagers for decades. The practice is slowly changing, but many former child soldiers live with the scars of their experiences.
April 7, 2015 / PBS NewsHour
Steve Sapienza
In Cambodia, motorcycle sales have surged in recent decades, but so have fatalities from motorcycle accidents.
Image by Cameron Conaway. India, 2013.
April 7, 2015
Cameron Conaway
India has declared 2015-2016 as Jal Kranti Varsh, or Water Revolution Year. What will this mean for the Ganges, the country’s most sacred and notoriously polluted river?
April 7, 2015 / Huffington Post
Cameron Conaway
One year into his tenure, India's Prime Minister Narendra Modi shifts his Ganges River rhetoric from "he" to "we."
April 7, 2015 / Foreign Affairs
Sim Chi Yin
The Chinese dream goes underground.
April 7, 2015 / The Guardian
Matt Kennard, Claire Provost
The purpose-built city of Naypyidaw—unveiled a decade ago this year–boasts 20-lane highways, golf courses, fast Wi-Fi and reliable electricity. The only thing it doesn’t seem to have is people.
April 6, 2015
Kalyanee Mam, Gary Marcuse
Pulitzer Center grantee filmmakers Kalyanee Mam and Gary Marcuse discuss land rights, religion and the environment, and gentrification with D.C. students.
April 6, 2015
Tom Hundley, Matthew Niederhauser, John Fitzgerald
What is at stake in the fight over the Mumbai waterfront?
April 2, 2015 / Virginia Quarterly Review
Erik Vance, Dominic Bracco II
Two forces threaten the sustainability of sharks—fishermen in developing countries like Mexico and consumers in China. Both seem unstoppable but both will have to change if sharks are to survive.
April 2, 2015 / The Atlantic's Citylab
Matthew Niederhauser
In a megacity desperate for better planning, activists are calling for a more sustainable future for the Mumbai Port.

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