Region

Asia

The World's Most Common Contraception Has a Dark Past

In India, many women have died getting sterilized—but it remains the most widespread contraceptive method both there and in the rest of the world. Why is it so popular, and what are the drawbacks?

The Unburied Stone

The story of Yoshihama's tsunami stone, borne ashore in 1933 and inscribed with text, buried in 1961 beneath a coastal road, and resurrected by the 2011 tsunami.

At the Khmer Rouge Tribunal

The Khmer Rouge Tribunal—"Asia's Nuremberg"—was created in 1997 to bring accountability for the Khmer Rouge era atrocities. 20 years and $320 million later, it has secured only three convictions.

Preparing for Japan's Next Tsunami

The island nation’s new warning system will broadcast qualitative alerts after future tsunamigenic Pacific megathrust earthquakes to motivate at-risk residents to evacuate.

September 11, 2018

The Future of Family Planning in India

Hannah Harris Green

India will soon be the most populous country in the world. Innovators throughout the country are creating new tools to help families stay small while taking control of their reproductive destinies.

September 07, 2018

In These Hills, Our Gods and Our Futures

Raghu Karnad, Arko Datto

In Odisha in eastern India, Arko Datto and Raghu Karnad cover the resistance of Dongria Kondh women to industrial interests that want to exploit their sacred hills for bauxite reserves.

September 05, 2018

India's Rumor Busters Face Daunting Task

Timothy McLaughlin

This project explores efforts being made across India—from government, media and tech companies—to address the issue of disinformation spreading on social media and messaging platforms.

August 29, 2018

Cambodia: Trauma, Justice, Governance

M. G. Zimeta

Cambodia's post-genocide journey creates new opportunities and risks in national systems such as health, justice, and tech governance. It also reveals remarkable stories of human courage over time.

August 27, 2018

The 2011 Japan Tsunami

Matthew Komatsu

From the personal to international, examining the long-term cultural impact of the 2011 Japan tsunami.

August 10, 2018

Myanmar's Rohingya: Anatomy of a Genocide

Jason Motlagh, Mark Oltmann, Patrick Brown

In 2017, Myanmar’s military targeted Rohingya Muslims in a pogrom of mass murder and rape. We investigate the deadliest massacre of a state-orchestrated genocide, years in the making.

August 09, 2018

Breathtaking: Gasping for Air Across the Globe

Larry C. Price

Airborne particles—sometimes much smaller than the width of a human hair—are not just contributing to climate change. They are a leading driver of serious illness the world over.

August 03, 2018

A Safe Place to Learn and Grow

Jaime Joyce

Who are the Rohingya? Why have they fled Myanmar? "A Safe Place to Learn and Grow" takes young readers to Bangladesh to learn what is being done to help refugee children heal and access education.

July 30, 2018

Losing Earth

Nathaniel Rich, George Steinmetz

Thirty years ago, we could have saved the planet. The world was ready to act. But we failed to do what was necessary to avoid a catastrophe.

Meet the Journalist: Jason Motlagh

Journalist Jason Motlagh talks about his experience reporting on the persecution of Myanmar’s ethnic Rohingya minority—and the warning signs that went ignored prior to last year’s genocidal violence.

Meet the Journalists: Phil Caller and Tania Rashid

Phil Caller and Tania Rashid discuss their three-part series for PBS NewsHour on the Rohingya refugee crisis—reporting on the mass exodus, rape, child marriage, and human trafficking—and finding a strong will to live and tenacity among the people.

Call to Release Shahidul Alam

The Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting is calling on Bangladeshi authorities to promptly release photographer Shahidul Alam, who was arrested and beaten by police on Sunday, August 5, 2018.