October 10, 2012 /
Paul Salopek
Journalist Paul Salopek is preparing to leave on a journey that will take seven years and span 39 countries—and he is doing it all on foot.
A soldier walks through an alley in the vicinity of Methar Lam. Image by Cpl. James L. Yarboro. Afghanistan, 2005.
January 19, 2017 / Harper's
May Jeong
What will await Trump in Afghanistan?
January 19, 2017 /
May Jeong
The task of making peace in Afghanistan seem to have fallen on the shoulders of unlikely men. This is the story of their efforts to end the war in Afghanistan.
Lake Urmia in the Sharafkhaneh Port. Image by Ako Salemi. Iran, 2016.
January 19, 2017
Ako Salemi
Persephone Miel Fellow Ako Salemi discusses his project on climate change in Iran.
Nuclear power plant in Cattenom, France. Image by Stefan Kühn courtesy of Wikimedia Commons. France, 2005.
January 17, 2017
Tom Hundley
This week: nuclear power's role in combatting global warming, the hidden lives of migrant workers, and what America gave El Salvador.
A North Korean citizen enjoying herself at a shooting range in Pyongyang. Image by Laya Maheshwari. North Korea, 2016.
January 16, 2017 / Fandor
Laya Maheshwari
In 1962, an American soldier defected to North Korea. He's still there. This documentary tells his story.
The author Tan Hecheng stands on "Widow's Bridge," where dozens of people were clubbed to death and thrown into the river in a wave of genocide that took place in 1967. These sorts of hidden histories still haunt the new superpower. Image by Sim Chi Yin/ VII Photo Agency. China, 2016.
January 13, 2017 / The New York Review of Books
Ian Johnson
Put your butcher's sword down! Latest in my series of Q&As with leading Chinese thinkers about China's past, present and future. I traveled to rural China with Tan to look at the scene of a...
Image by Misha Friedman. South Africa, 2016.
January 13, 2017
kem knapp sawyer, Jordan Roth, Jon Cohen, Misha Friedman, Aditi Kantipuly, Amy Maxmen, Rebecca Sananes, Ana P. Santos, Jennifer Stephens, Patrick Reilly, Jane Darby Menton, Evey Wilson, Emily Baumgaertner, Rebecca Kaplan, Libby Allen, John Morrison
Pulitzer Center launches its newest e-book: To End Aids featuring stories, photographs and video by our grantees. Also included: a timeline, interactive maps, a glossary, and resources.
Close to 40 men and women sit around a table and share a meal inside the kitchen of the shelter.
January 13, 2017
Xyza Bacani
Singapore is a prosperous country in Asia and migrant workers have played an important role in its success, but at what cost?
Two protesters, Sara and Sunny, holding signs in solidarity with the khawaja sira community.  Signs right to left read: "Let us live, too" and  "Government members, stop discriminating against khawaja siras." Image by Ikra Javed. Pakistan, 2016.
January 12, 2017 / Untold Stories
Ikra Javed
The international LGBT movement is far from over, but rarely does change come without passion— and protests. Though maybe just the start, see what some Pakistanis did to combat transgender abuse.
A church in Singapore where some migrant workers worship. Image by Xyza Bacani. Singapore, 2016.
January 12, 2017 / The New York Times
Xyza Bacani
Migrant workers are invisible people,We are like air. People need us but they don’t see us. We exist to please them, to serve them, but they don’t really see us as part of the society.
A young Syrian refugee packs tea boxes under a table in a Turkish factory near his refugee camp on the Turkey-Syria border.
January 10, 2017 / WNYC Radio
Malia Politzer, Emily Kassie
Journalists Malia Politzer and Emily Kassie discuss their project in the HuffingtonPost Highline, “The 21st Century Gold Rush: How the refugee crisis is changing the world economy."
January 9, 2017 / New Security Beat
Nikita Sampath
Rising sea levels and intense cyclones have turned the drinking water saline in coastal Bangladesh. The villagers cope the best they can.

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