Region

Africa

Eritrean Asylum Seekers in Israel

This field note tells the story of a single mother from Eritrea, seeking asylum in Israel, and some of the struggles she has faced after she injured her hand and became unable to work.

Afropunk Brings The 'Black Lives Matter' Ethos Abroad

Afropunk's festival has come of age. In reaching the next phase of its evolution, it's upholding the long African American musical tradition of sociopolitical influence around the world.

How Cape Town Defeated Day Zero—for Now

Reporting from Cape Town, South Africa, Jacqueline Flynn explores the reality of living with Level 6 water restrictions and the little changes that made the biggest difference for Capetonians during the water crisis.

Cape Town Water Crisis: A Timeline

What were the first signs of a looming water crisis in Cape Town? What restrictions were placed on residents? And how did Capetonians reduce their water consumption?

Cape Town: Signs of the Water Crisis

For months, street corners, buildings, and bathroom mirrors served as constant reminders for Capetonians of the looming threat of the water crisis and suggested new ways to save water.

September 04, 2018

The Globalization of AFROPUNK

Melissa Bunni Elian

AFROPUNK connects the African Diaspora not only through music, but also socially and politically, proving it to be a global movement that parallels the current politics facing young South Africans.

August 30, 2018

Lessons from the Cape Town Water Crisis

Jacqueline Flynn

Cape Town, South Africa, has saved its 3.7 million citizens from becoming very thirsty—for now. What lessons can the world learn about handling drought?

August 23, 2018

The Race for Cobalt

Vivienne Walt, Sebastian Meyer

Vivienne Walt and Sebastian Meyer traveled to the Democratic Republic of Congo, home to most of the world's cobalt, to see how huge global demand can be met without rampant child labor and corruption.

August 13, 2018

Helping the Poor: What Works in Rwanda?

Marc Gunther

Governments, foundations, and nonprofits aim to help the world's poorest people by giving them livestock, cash, training, and education. What works best? How do we know?

August 08, 2018

A Journey Through Contested Lands: Tanzania

Thomas Dworzak

A moving photo essay about the Maasai in northeast Tanzania, who are struggling to make a living on ancestral lands that the government keeps trying to take away.

July 30, 2018

Losing Earth

Nathaniel Rich, George Steinmetz

Thirty years ago, we could have saved the planet. The world was ready to act. But we failed to do what was necessary to avoid a catastrophe.

July 17, 2018

Restorative Businesses

Esha Chhabra

Entrepreneurs and investors are rewriting the rules of business, challenging conventional growth principles to build an economy fueled by transparency and equality.

July 12, 2018

Cape Town's Water Crisis

Brett Walton

After three years of severe drought, Cape Town’s water supply is at the brink of failure. How do leaders and residents respond to an era of unreliable water?

June 11, 2018

Far from Over

Jon Cohen, William Brangham, Jason Kane, Misha Friedman

Tools are now available to prevent and treat HIV infections, but Russia, Nigeria and the U.S. state of Florida each are struggling, for different reasons, to fully exploit the power of these tools.

April 16, 2018

A Special Kind of School

Jaime Joyce

What does it mean to be a refugee? What is it like to live in and go to school at a refugee camp? "A Special Kind of School" takes young readers to Kenya to visit the classrooms of refugee students.

Meet the Journalist: Deborah Bloom

In a densely populated village outside Mombasa in Kenya, the effects of industrial pollution continue to harm inhabitants. Deborah Bloom chronicles an activist's fight against it.

Meet the Journalist: Yasmin Bendaas

Yasmin Bendaas discusses reporting in Algeria—a 2012 project on the disappearing tradition of facial tattoos among the Chaouia and a current project on the effect of climate change on sheepherders.

Meet the Journalist: Jon Cohen

Nigeria, Russia, and Florida have each had difficulty mounting a strong response to HIV/AIDS, at a time when neighboring countries or states have made progress in bringing their epidemics to an end.

Meet the Journalist: Tom Gardner

Journalist Tom Gardner discusses a two-part series of articles exploring Ethiopia's so-called "development state" and the crisis of expectations driving mass protest and exodus.

Meet the Journalist: Tom Gardner

Tom Gardner discusses his reporting as he follows the railway from Addis Ababa to the Djibouti coast examining efforts of the Ethiopian government to use grand infrastructure to develop a poor region.

Meet the Journalist: Estacio Valoi

Oxpeckers Investigative Environmental Journalism's Estacio Valoi discusses Kruger's contested borderlands and how he overcame the challenges of reporting in a remote zone by using new media tools.

This Week: Child Labor and Your Smartphone

This week: cobalt mining comes from one of the planet's poorest countries and all too often it is mined by children, skepticism about Kosovo's deradicalization and rehabilitation programs for returning jihadists, and Pulitzer Center welcomes new Executive Editor, Indira Lakshmanan.

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