Region

Africa

The War on Poaching

More than 1,100 rhinos were killed for their horns in Africa in 2016. Quasi-military conservation units are trying to stop the slaughter.

September 12, 2017

An Uneasy Stasis for LGBT Ugandans

Jake Naughton

For LGBTQ Ugandans, the infamous 'Kill The Gays' bill brought not only unexpected benefits in the form of foreign funding and support, but also a violent backlash among the general public.

August 31, 2017

The U.S.-China Nuclear Rapprochement

Richard Stone

An extraordinary collaboration between U.S. and Chinese nuclear scientists is setting the stage for greater cooperation between the two countries in addressing security threats.

August 29, 2017

Rhinoceros Poaching in South Africa

Kelsey Emery

South African wildlife sits on the brink of disaster as rhinos continue to be poached. With so much at stake, villagers fight to protect the keystone species, resources, and the tourism industry.

August 06, 2017

Data in a Crisis

Amy Maxmen, Neil Brandvold

In the chaos of crisis and human displacement, aid organizations struggle to track, analyze and respond to information fast enough to provide help. Tech and data science is providing a solution.

July 19, 2017

Morocco as a Moderate Islamic Hub

Jackie Spinner

Morocco is on the verge of transformation, maneuvering to be a financial and political leader in Africa and hub for tolerant Islam. Will a divided society go along with its liberal king?

June 26, 2017

The Privatization of Education in Africa

Peg Tyre

The fastest growing chain of schools in the world is a highly controversial for-profit company backed by Silicon Valley investors which promises to educate the poorest of the poor.

June 20, 2017

Rwanda: Climate Change and Mountain Gorillas

Elham Shabahat

In Rwanda, increased floods, droughts, and landslides have caused deaths and destroyed homes. How are mountain gorillas and people living near their habitat impacted by and adapting to climate change?

May 29, 2017

The Black Death of Kabwe

Larry C. Price

Years of unmitigated contamination from Zambia's largest lead mine have created a toxic nightmare for the residents of Kabwe, the country's second largest city.

May 02, 2017

South Sudan in Crisis

Jane Ferguson

South Sudan is the world’s newest nation but ethnic violence, economic collapse and famine are spiralling. Millions of lives, and the future of the country, are at stake.

Meet the Journalist: Peg Tyre

"Bridge International Academies" is a for-profit company that seeks to educate some of the world’s poorest children. Its Silicon Valley investors call it “revolutionary.” Others are skeptical.

Meet the Journalist: Fred Pearce

200 environmental and human rights activists are assassinated each year, according to Global Witness. Fred Pearce investigates the headline-grabbing slayings of three of these activists.

This Week: An Unusual US-China Partnership

This week: Keeping nuclear material out of the hands of terrorists, a disappearing collaboration between fishermen and dolphins, and trauma specialists heal after ISIS.

This Week: China's Strategic Investment in Africa

This week: The overlap of Beijing's economic and geopolitical goals, the rise of chronic diseases in violent regions, and grantee Dan Grossman discusses the art of covering climate change.

Another Win for "The End of AIDS?"

Pulitzer Center-supported PBS NewsHour series wins a 2017 Communication Award from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

Doing Business with Congo's Kabila

Jason Stearns, director of the Congo Research Group, discusses a comprehensive report that documents the network of business interests of the Congo's President and his extended family.

This Week: The President's Wealth

This week: President Kabila's vast network of family-owned businesses, a comedy group in India fights ISIS with laughter, and Syrian refugees look for a sense of belonging in Germany.

Facing Risk: Journalists and their Families

This lesson, designed for journalists and journalism students, uses the film "Facing Risk" to guide a conversation about the impact of reporting dangerous stories on journalists and their families.

Telling Science Stories: Data Visualization

This lesson shows students how journalists use data visualization to effectively communicate scientific issues—and directs students to create their own projects using the mapping platform CartoDB.

Okur: Thinking Like a Journalist

This lesson introduces students to Paul Salopek's Out of Eden walk and asks students to write a journalistic "milestone" describing their surroundings.

Migration and Refugees Lesson Plans

The following lesson plans for middle school teachers, high school teachers and college professors introduce reporting connected to migration and the experiences of refugees.

Related Issues