October 10, 2012 /
Paul Salopek
Journalist Paul Salopek is preparing to leave on a journey that will take seven years and span 39 countries—and he is doing it all on foot.
Ben Freeth returns to the ruins of his home, which was burned down in 2009. Image by Martin Fletcher. Zimbabwe, 2017.
January 20, 2017 / International Business Times
Martin Fletcher
Ben Freeth's family farm was Zimbabwe's biggest mango producer until Robert Mugabe's 'war vets' seized it in 2009. Now, as millions of Zimbabweans survive on foreign food aid, it produces nothing.
Sources interviewed in Khartoum describe signs of what they see as a pending relaxation of economic sanctions against the North African country, which has been subject to a comprehensive U.S. trade embargo for nearly 20 years. Image by Kira Zalan. Sudan, 2016.
January 18, 2017 / PRI's The World
Kira Zalan
A new de-radicalization program provides a window into Sudan's efforts to fight extremism, while maintaining legitimacy with its Islamist base.
Image by Misha Friedman. South Africa, 2016.
January 13, 2017
kem knapp sawyer, Jordan Roth, Jon Cohen, Misha Friedman, Aditi Kantipuly, Amy Maxmen, Rebecca Sananes, Ana P. Santos, Jennifer Stephens, Patrick Reilly, Jane Darby Menton, Evey Wilson, Emily Baumgaertner, Rebecca Kaplan, Libby Allen, John Morrison
Pulitzer Center launches its newest e-book: To End Aids featuring stories, photographs and video by our grantees. Also included: a timeline, interactive maps, a glossary, and resources.
A screen shot of Everyday Africa's Instagram feed, showing a collection of new photographs of Africans living their lives on the continent.
January 12, 2017
Everyday Africa was highlighted by both Bill Gates and The New York Times for their work that transcends stereotypes and presents "normal life" on the African continent.
Cherries, the fruit of the coffee tree, generally contain two coffee beans--actually two seeds, each with one flat side--inside. Tanzania is famous for its peaberry coffee, produced by a rare mutation that creates only a single seed with no flat part. Image by Dan Grossman. Tanzania, 2016.
January 11, 2017 / WBUR
Dan Grossman
Global warming is heating things up, causing all sorts of problems — including for coffee growers. In northern Tanzania, growers are finding weather conditions increasingly unsuitable.
A young Syrian refugee packs tea boxes under a table in a Turkish factory near his refugee camp on the Turkey-Syria border.
January 10, 2017 / WNYC Radio
Malia Politzer, Emily Kassie
Journalists Malia Politzer and Emily Kassie discuss their project in the HuffingtonPost Highline, “The 21st Century Gold Rush: How the refugee crisis is changing the world economy."
@Jostfranko follows the path of cotton from growers and harvesters in Burkina Faso to production in Bangladesh and Romania, and finally Western Europe in the form of retail garments. Image by Jost Franko. 2016.
January 9, 2017 / Open Society Foundation
Jošt Franko, Meta Krese
Open Society Foundations instagram takeover with the Global supply chain of cotton industry project
The homes of Mount Carmel farmworkers were also destroyed by fire in August 2009. Image courtesy of Ben Freeth. Zimbabwe, 2009.
January 7, 2017 / The Telegraph
Martin Fletcher
Eight years after Robert Mugabe's war veterans seized his family's farm, Ben Freeth returns to find it desolate and abandoned.
Beyebo Eresado and a fellow villager describe how their community in southern Ethiopia stopped female genital mutilation. Image by Amy Yee. Ethiopia, 2016.
January 5, 2017 / Voice of America
Amy Yee
Attitudes toward female genital mutilation are slowly changing in Ethiopia.
Carrying cotton to the collection point in Diongolo, Burkina Faso. Image by Jošt Franko. Burkina Faso, 2016
January 5, 2017
Meta Krese, Jošt Franko
Meta Krese and Jost Franko discuss today’s globalized economy by connecting growers of cotton from Burkina Faso, the garment industry in Bangladesh, and European consumers.
Nyabany and her daughter wait at a clinic at the U.N. base in Bentiu, South Sudan, on Dec. 18, 2016. Eight-month-old Nyadholi is suffering from severe acute malnutrition. Image by Cassandra Vinograd. South Sudan, 2016.
January 5, 2017 / VICE News
Cassandra Vinograd
For months, Nyabany and her five children had avoided the gunfire. But they were dying all the same.
Johannesburg
January 3, 2017 / Untold Stories
Mark Olalde
South Africa has historically failed to properly regulate closure of the mines that helped build its economy. These photos chronicle the country's attempt to play catch up.

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