Region

Africa

Drones in the Sahara

A massive U.S. drone base could destabilize Niger — and may even be illegal under its constitution.

New E-book: 'Toxic Planet: The Global Health Crisis'

The Pulitzer Center launches its newest e-book: "Toxic Planet: The Global Health Crisis"—a searing look at pollution, an issue that affects us all. Now available on iTunes, Atavist, and Kindle.

Keeping Refugees in Africa

Since last summer, the flow of refugees from Libya to Europe has shrunk considerably. The EU attributes this to its own successful policy, but reality is a lot more depressing.

Outrage and Inspire

Roger Thurow shares stories of hunger across the world in a new podcast produced in collaboration with the Chicago Council on Global Affairs.

November 29, 2017

The Hustlers' Embassy

Yepoka Yeebo

The embassy was in a run down colonial building. President Obama's portrait was on the wall. The visas cost $6,000. Only one problem: none of it was real.

November 27, 2017

An American War in the Sahara

Joe Penney

The U.S. military is building a major drone base in the Sahara Desert in Niger. Joe Penney looks at how an increasing American military presence will change the West African country.

November 10, 2017

A High-Impact Health Solution in Nigeria

T.R. Goldman

Here’s how one Nigerian state tackled the deadly bacterial infections that kill hundreds of thousands of babies worldwide each year—and why such a seemingly simple solution is so tough to pull off.

October 12, 2017

Climate Change and Sheepherding in Algeria

Yasmin Bendaas

Although Algeria is a low emitter of greenhouse gasses, environmental changes like lower rainfall, higher temperatures, and longer cycles of drought have slashed profits for Algerian sheepherders.

October 05, 2017

Europe Slams Its Gates

Ty McCormick, Cameron Abadi, Peter Tinti, Nichole Sobecki, Jill Filipovic

A series on Europe’s controversial "pay-to-stay" effort to fight migration at its source.

September 12, 2017

An Uneasy Situation for LGBT Ugandans

Jake Naughton

For LGBTQ Ugandans, the infamous 'Kill The Gays' bill brought not only unexpected benefits in the form of foreign funding and support, but also a violent backlash among the general public.

September 05, 2017

C.A.R. Crisis: When the State Is Absent

Cassandra Vinograd

As the Central African Republic slips back into chaos, the government is mostly powerless to intervene. Armed groups hold the power. Here's what happens—and who steps in—when state authority is absent.

August 31, 2017

The U.S.-China Nuclear Rapprochement

Richard Stone

An extraordinary collaboration between U.S. and Chinese nuclear scientists is setting the stage for greater cooperation between the two countries in addressing security threats.

Meet the Journalist: Jackie Spinner

Jackie Spinner spent three months in Morocco exploring the ways in which the country has become a moderate Islamic hub in the North Africa and to examine the contrast between image and reality.

Meet the Journalist: Yepoka Yeebo

For over a decade, there existed a fake U.S. Embassy in Accra, Ghana. When the news broke, there were more questions than answers and some officials are convinced it didn't happen.

Meet the Journalist: Mark Johnson

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reporter Mark Johnson and photojournalist Mark Hoffman traveled to Brazil, Kenya, and Uganda to report on the threat of zoonotic diseases long associated with poverty.

 

Meet the Journalist: T.R. Goldman

What does it take for a developing country like Nigeria to roll out a new healthcare protocol for newborns on a national scale? T.R. Goldman discusses the challenges this country faces.

Meet the Journalist: Peter Gwin

How does a country fail? Peter Gwin spent three years traveling to the Central African Republic to look at how a rebellion destroyed the nation and what's happened to its wealth of resources.

This Week: Europe Slams Its Gates

This week: A deep dive into the complexities of European migration, our grantees win an Emmy, and how the Internet hurt Myanmar overnight.

"The End of AIDS?" Wins an Emmy

Another big win PBS NewsHour, Science, and the Pulitzer Center, for "The End of AIDS?" Finding new ways to tell stories that matter on issues that affect us all.

This Week: Friends With Dictators

This week: The U.S.'s troublesome alliances with African dictators, Pulitzer tackles homophobia through NewsArts, and the true meaning of the Iraqi Kurdish referendum.

Everyday DC: Lesson 7

Lesson 7/7. In this lesson, students conclude their work on Everyday DC by completing a final individual and collaborative project.

Everyday DC: Lesson 2

Lesson 2/7. In this lesson, students begin to identify subjects for their Everyday DC project, using Everyday Africa photos as a model.

Everyday DC: Lesson 1

Lesson 1/7. This lesson introduces students to Everyday Africa and the Everyday DC unit through interactive activities.

Facing Risk: Journalists and their Families

This lesson, designed for journalists and journalism students, uses the film "Facing Risk" to guide a conversation about the impact of reporting dangerous stories on journalists and their families.

Telling Science Stories: Data Visualization

This lesson shows students how journalists use data visualization to effectively communicate scientific issues—and directs students to create their own projects using the mapping platform CartoDB.

Exploring Other Countries

In this lesson, students use the Pulitzer Center website to research a specific country before giving an oral presentation. 

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