October 10, 2012 /
Paul Salopek
Journalist Paul Salopek is preparing to leave on a journey that will take seven years and span 39 countries—and he is doing it all on foot.
Carletonville sinkhole
December 1, 2016 / The Star
Mark Olalde
Five decades of mining on the Far West Rand outside Johannesburg contributed to the formation of more than 1,000 sinkholes. As companies abandon mines, many fear this will set off new sinkholes.
President Jacob Zuma speaks to Parliament in October about the marine economy. Courtesy: Republic of South Africa. South Africa, 2016.
November 23, 2016 / Inter Press Service
Mark Olalde
Southern Africa finds itself at the center of the offshore bulk sediment mining debate as international companies rush to strip mine phosphate deposits in coastal waters of South Africa and Namibia.
Workers at John Hume's rhino ranch prepare to remove the horn of a rhino. Image by Rachel Nuwer. South Africa, 2016.
November 22, 2016 / Newsweek
Rachel Nuwer
Legalizing trade in rhinoceros horns could help save the species, but some experts worry it might stimulate demand and encourage poachers.
November 18, 2016 / VICE News
Amy Maxmen
PrEP drugs like Truvada can drastically lower the risk of HIV transmission. But young women in South Africa are pushing for a different kind of change.
November 18, 2016
Dan Grossman
An unintended planet-wide experiment is underway–leading to warming temperatures and an acidifying ocean.
Optimism turned to worry after delegates at COP22 absorbed news of Donald Trump's victory. Image by Dan Grossman. Morocco, 2016.
November 18, 2016 / Yale Climate Connections
Dan Grossman
At a global climate summit, news of the U.S. presidential election result turned the mood from cheery and celebratory to somber and defiant.
An illegal miner displays gold ore dug from an abandoned mine in Johannesburg. South Africa, 2016. Image by Mark Olalde.
November 18, 2016
Mark Olalde
Meet journalist Mark Olalde who is investigating the costs of abandoned mines and the active minerals extraction industry in South Africa.
The flags of many nations fly at the COP22 climate conference in Marrakesh. The nearly 200 nations committed to the Paris Climate Agreement were stunned this week when President elect Trump announced his plans to rush to withdraw from the accord. Image by Justin Catanoso. Morocco, 2016.
November 18, 2016 / Mongabay
Justin Catanoso
As President elect Trump seeks a quick exit from the Paris Climate Accord, the international community at the COP22 climate summit says the world will go forward without the US; China may lead.
The tide rolls in on the shores of Cape Town, South Africa. Prospecting rights for offshore mining cover 10 percent of the country's exclusive marine economic zone. Image by Mark Olalde. South Africa, 2016.
November 12, 2016 / Oxpeckers
Mark Olalde
Offshore mining prospecting rights cover 10 percent of South Africa's marine economic zone. With the country's inability to properly close mines, a large opposition movement fears offshore mining.
Climate experts fear catastrophe unless the world grapples with global warming without delay. Image by Daniel Grossman. 2016.
November 11, 2016 / WBUR
Dan Grossman
Negotiators in Morocco are ironing out the details of the Paris climate agreement—and they're coming to grips with what a Trump presidency might mean for it.
An open-air market in Marrakesh, Morocco. The city is hosting November’s COP22 Climate Conference and decisions made there could shape its future. If the rising heat brought by global warming isn’t abated, then parts of North Africa could become inhabitable by mid-century, according to a 2016 study. Image by Feliciano Guimarães via Creative Commons. Morocco, 2016.
November 3, 2016 / Mongabay
Justin Catanoso
This month’s 22nd UN climate conference in Morocco is critical for putting practical mechanisms in place to determine how the world’s nations will curb climate change.
Trash piled up around Setswetla's chemical toilets. Image by Christian Belanger, South Africa, 2016.
October 27, 2016 / Untold Stories
Christian Belanger
A look into the life of residents in Setswetla, an informal settlement in Johannesburg's Alexandra Township.

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