Reports by Pulitzer Center journalists for print, online and broadcast news outlets
December 19, 2014 / Time Tomas van Houtryve
Affordable drones are giving us a new—perhaps temporary—vantage on the world.
December 18, 2014 / Nature
Erika Check Hayden
A frontline report from Sierra Leone examines efforts to change hearts and minds in West Africa’s villages.
December 18, 2014 / The New Yorker
Jenna Krajeski
In the power struggle between Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan and exiled imam Fethullah Gülen, the first casualty has been freedom of the press.
October 30, 2014 / Foreign Policy
Caryle Murphy
In Saudi Arabia, a new generation is pushing back against the government’s embrace of fundamentalism. But is the kingdom ready for nonbelievers?
October 29, 2014 / The Ecologist
Dimiter Kenarov
With 300,000 hectares of forests, fields and steppes damaged by fire, the war in Ukraine has done huge damage to the country's environment. But there has been an upside: a new green spirit.
October 29, 2014 / The Nation
Dimiter Kenarov
Climate change is destroying Odessa’s famed Kuyalnik Estuary, where health tourists and war refugees live side by side.
October 25, 2014 / Religion & Ethics News Weekly
Fred de Sam Lazaro, Gary Marcuse
An unlikely partnership between religion and government may hold the answer to China's growing environmental crisis.
October 24, 2014 / The New Yorker
Jason Larkin
Pulitzer Center grantee Jason Larkin traveled to Marikana, South Africa, to follow up on the 2012 massacre that left 34 striking miners dead at the hands of government security forces.
October 22, 2014 / Foreign Policy
Meghan Dhaliwal
This is what dismantling 10 years of war in Afghanistan looks like.
October 22, 2014 / Foreign Policy
Meg Jones
Thirteen years after Wisconsin’s 829th Engineer Co. deployed to build Afghanistan’s war infrastructure, they’re back to tear it apart and take it home.
October 21, 2014 / Harper's
James Harkin
How did a terror organization considered too bloody for Al Qaeda morph into something like a government with its own territory—and with troops at the border of a NATO member state?
October 19, 2014 / Mother Jones
Kalyanee Mam
A deal between a Chinese hydro company and Cambodian power brokers has put the Areng Valley at risk. Can villagers and activists save it?
October 17, 2014 / Des Moines Register
Lynn Hicks, Rodney White
"Locally grown," can be a hard sell when the Chinese government admits that nearly 20 percent of the nation's soils are polluted.

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