Reports by Pulitzer Center journalists for print, online and broadcast news outlets
March 6, 2015 / DW Sara Shahriari, Noah Friedman-Rudovsky
A new move by the Bolivian government to address high rates of violence against women by funding the construction shelters and improviing legal aid.
March 6, 2015 / Foreign Policy
Michael Edison Hayden
Narendra Modi wants India to embrace its traditional systems of medicine, like ayurveda and yoga. But can he convince rich Indians to treat their ailments with lead pills and squirming bugs?
March 5, 2015 / National Geographic
Jason Motlagh, Tim McGirk
In the midst of Syria's civil war, doctors and a network of young volunteers are venturing into combat zones to vaccinate children against polio.
January 28, 2015 / Foreign Policy
Brian Castner, Cheryl Hatch
John Nel was sent to build a lifesaving Ebola clinic in the middle of the Liberian jungle. It opened too late to help fight this outbreak, but could help prevent a new one.
January 28, 2015 / National Geographic
Amy Maxmen
How poverty, density, and fragmentation in Sierra Leone's capital city fueled the spread of the deadly Ebola virus.
January 25, 2015 / Al Jazeera America
Sim Chi Yin, Ian Johnson
Former bomb shelters and dank basements are now home to hundreds of thousands of rural migrants seeking to forge a new life in China's booming capital.
January 25, 2015 / Triad Business Journal
Justin Catanoso
Leaders in the U.S., the European Union and Australia, as well as China and India—the leading carbon emitters—will always be conflicted in fighting climate change. But mayors? Far less so.
January 22, 2015 / Huffington Post
Yunfan Sun, Leah Thompson
The filmmakers behind the documentary "Down to the Countryside" discuss China's rapidly disappearing rural villages.
January 19, 2015 / Foreign Policy
Tom Hundley, Ana P. Santos
Welcome to the Philippines, home to philandering politicians, millions of “illegitimate” children, and marital laws that make Italy look liberal.
January 19, 2015 / Foreign Policy
Dimiter Kenarov
Ukrainians thought that, post-Maidan, their country would start to look more like Europe. But for members of the LGBT community, things may have even gotten worse.
January 19, 2015 / National Geographic
Allison Shelley
Photojournalist Allison Shelley documented Haiti for a year after the 2010 quake. She went back this month to check on rebuilding progress.
January 18, 2015 / VICE News
Brian Castner, Cheryl Hatch
Liberian schools forced to close because of Ebola are set to reopen February 2, but the country's education system could look vastly different than it did a year ago.
January 18, 2015 / The New Yorker
Jacob Kushner, Allison Shelley
Uncertainty over land ownership has played out across Haiti as the country attempts to attract foreign investment in tourism, mining, manufacturing, and agriculture.

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