Reports by Pulitzer Center journalists for print, online and broadcast news outlets
May 26, 2015 / The Washington Post Dan Zak
Nuclear talks at UN end in failure amid strife over Israel, a proposed Middle East ban on WMD and attacks on the failure of nuclear-weapons states to take meaningful steps toward disarmament.
May 26, 2015 / Blink
Tomas van Houtryve
Laurence Cornet talked with journalist Tomas van Houtryve about what drone imagery might mean for the future of photojournalism.
May 24, 2015 / Tiny Spark
Amy Maxmen
Billions of taxpayer dollars go to aid in a crisis, but neither a reporter on Ebola nor an economist looking at Haiti could figure out where the money went.
May 4, 2015 / Quartz
Daniella Zalcman
Almost every First Nations person has ties to Canada’s Indian Residential School system—a network of federally run, Christian boarding schools that were meant to assimilate indigenous youth.
May 4, 2015 / Medium
Wyatt Orme, Tik Root
Kepler University is blending online learning with in-person instruction — and is seeing startling results.
May 3, 2015 / The Atavist
Joshua Hammer
In 2001, two unlikely friends created a music festival in Mali that drew the likes of Bono and Robert Plant. Then radical Islam tore them apart.
May 3, 2015 / nhpr
Matt Hongoltz-Hetling
Can a small NGO overcome a centuries-long culture gap to bring pregnant mothers, and the traditional healers those mothers trust, into a health clinic?
May 1, 2015 / Al Jazeera America
Sara Shahriari, Noah Friedman-Rudovsky
The death of María Isabel Pillco illustrates how far the country has to go in changing a culture of domestic abuse.
April 30, 2015 / Thomson Reuters Foundation
Chris Arsenault
Mali agreed to lease Libya 100,000 hectares of farmland in a 2008 agreement called the Malibya project. The deal has been controversial as local farmers believe they could be displaced.
April 30, 2015 / Foreign Policy
Elizabeth Dickinson
King Salman’s pre-dawn shake-up of the royal family marks the true start of his reign. Will it smooth things over with Washington?
April 29, 2015 / Thomson Reuters Foundation
Chris Arsenault
Urban farmers in Bamako are growing food on some of the most expensive land in Mali's capital in what they call a "land occupation."
April 28, 2015 / PRI's The World
Bridget Huber
A technique developed by an American surgeon in Uganda is now helping kids in the US as well. "Global surgery is a two-way street," says Dr. Benjamin Warf.
April 27, 2015 / PRI's The World
Bridget Huber
Facing a severe shortage of surgeons, Mozambique decided to train non-physicians to do life-saving operations.

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