Reports by Pulitzer Center journalists for print, online and broadcast news outlets
August 21, 2014 / Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Meg Jones, Meghan Dhaliwal
Wisconsin National Guard troops stay in touch with their families via Facebook, Skype, phone calls and email.
August 21, 2014 / Vanity Fair
James Harkin
The most dangerous place in the world for journalists is Syria, where dozens have been killed or kidnapped.
August 21, 2014 / Reuters
David Rohde
European governments pay ransoms for the release of hostages held by terrorists. The U.S. does not. What that gap means for Americans like journalist James Foley.
July 31, 2014 / The Nation
Michelle Goldberg
The so-called “Swedish model” of banning the purchase but not the sale of sex is catching on in Europe. But does it work? And for whom?
July 31, 2014 / National Geographic
Justin Catanoso
To put an accurate price on carbon, you need to know how much you have and where it’s located, researchers say.
July 30, 2014 / The Guardian | Global Development
Jessica Hatcher
Prolonged dry spells push pastoralists to the brink of starvation as food prices soar and cattle raids spiral out of control.
July 30, 2014 / The New York Times
Kalyanee Mam
In a remote valley in Cambodia, a group of young monks join the Chong people in a fight to protect their forests, livelihood and heritage from the looming construction of a hydroelectric dam.
July 29, 2014 / Roads & Kingdoms
Jeremy Relph, Dominic Bracco II
In these rural lands, poverty, murder, and injustice fuel a battle between farmers and rich landowners.
July 28, 2014 / Grist
Joanne Silberner
Watching the ocean inch up to your doorstep can be pretty stressful. Researchers are studying the ways climate change can undermine our well-being, and how we can bounce back.
July 25, 2014 / Al Jazeera America
Alice Su
Jordan hosts refugees from not only Syria but also Iraq, Sudan, Somalia, Palestine and more. Most of these refugees are in cities, not camps, and stay not for days, but years. How will Jordan respond...
July 25, 2014 / PRI's The World
Rhitu Chatterjee
Although the school lunch program can foster tolerance, discrimination against lower castes persists in rural India.
July 23, 2014 / The New York Review of Books
Richard Bernstein
Thailand is being ruled by a military junta for the 19th time since 1932, but this time some Thais may not meekly go along; Bangkok's motorcycle taxi drivers show why.
July 22, 2014 / The Atlantic
Alice Su
Jordan’s real crisis is not the threat of encroaching extremism, but the grinding weight of hosting victims from the region’s various humanitarian emergencies. How much longer can the Kingdom last?

Pages