Reports by Pulitzer Center journalists for print, online and broadcast news outlets
A Tata Steel worker checks the temperature of the one of the plant's seven blast furnaces during an afternoon. Image by Michael Henninger. India, 2016.
October 20, 2016 / Pittsburgh Post-Gazette Daniel Moore, Michael Henninger
Life in Jamshedpur, founded a century ago as the "steel city" of India, embodies both India's industrial prowess and its challenges with changing energy production and limiting resource consumption.
Pacific Coast Highway. Image by Erik Vance. California, 2016.
October 18, 2016 / The Last Word On Nothing
Erik Vance
Erik Vance ponders the relationship between pilgrimage and coming of age. Whether walking for God or riding to bond with your dad, we all need a spiritual journey.
A boy stands at the gate of a refugee camp in Tompa, Hungary. Image by Bence Jardany via Wikimedia Commons. Hungary, 2016.
October 18, 2016 / Latterly
Laura Kasinof
This month, the E.U. expanded the power of its border patrol agency, Frontex.
 ICARDA associate scientist Ali Shehadeh tried to negotiate with rebel groups to maintain ICARDA's seed collection in Syria after the war broke out. Image by Jacob Russell. Lebanon, 2016.
October 18, 2016 / takepart
Jennifer Duggan
Scientists with a critical agricultural research organization are among the 11 million people forced to flee Syria's conflict. They took heroic steps to save resources vital for global food security.
October 17, 2016 / The Atlantic
Alice Su
Terror and religious extremism challenge a state unaccustomed to martyrdom narratives. Can a country doing business all over the world really avoid other peoples' politics?
Visiting Trinity Church in Berlin one Sunday in July 2016. Half of the service was translated into Farsi. Image by Laura Kasinof. Germany, 2016.
October 14, 2016 / The Atlantic
Laura Kasinof
Iranian asylum seekers in Germany are converting to Christianity and filling pews in churches across Germany. What's the reason for this phenomenon?
Sharon Henio-Yazzie (pictured with an abandoned school in Ramah) was one of roughly 40,000 children from 60 tribes placed in Mormon homes between 1947 and 2000
October 14, 2016 / World Policy Journal
Daniella Zalcman
Award winning photojournalist Daniella Zalcman speaks with the World Policy Journal's On Air podcast about her work.
Dallas nurse Nina Pham, was infected with Ebola in 2014 while caring for the first person to ever be diagnosed with the illness in the U.S.
October 14, 2016 / Dallas Morning News
Seema Yasmin
Ebola no longer dominates the headlines but for an estimated 17,000 survivors of the largest Ebola outbreak in history, the struggle is not over.
Wilfred Jackson at home
October 13, 2016 / The Atlantic
Brian Castner
They can see the global culture via satellite television, but cannot touch it, except to purchase the veneer on Amazon.
powered electricity to the village. The village in rural northwestern India uses kerosene and firewood for energy. Image by Michael Henninger. India, 2016.
October 13, 2016 / Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
Daniel Moore, Michael Henninger
With one in four people without power, India is a proving ground for clean energy. Researchers in Pittsburgh and India are hoping their technology can work—and make money—anywhere in the world.
A stream meanders through a wetland in Wakkerstroom, Mpumalanga. The region is a Strategic Water Source Area, the segments of South Africa, Lesotho and Swaziland that make up 8 percent of land area but account for 50 percent of water supply. Image by Mark Olalde. South Africa, 2016.
October 12, 2016 / Inter Press Service
Mark Olalde
With South Africa in the midst of a historic drought, the government continues to allow ambitious prospecting for coal mines in water-sensitive areas.
High-voltage power lines carry electricity from coal-fired power plants in Mpumalanga toward Gauteng. Image by Mark Olalde. South Africa, 2016.
October 12, 2016 / Oxpeckers
Mark Olalde
A controversial underground coal mine in a protected water catchment in Mpumalanga has moved closer to breaking ground after it was granted environmental authorisation and a water use licence.
Peer counseling at clinic for persons with spinal cord injuries
October 12, 2016 / Boston University News Service
Kate Petcosky-Kulkarni
In India, disability is both a consequence and a cause of abject poverty.