Reports by Pulitzer Center journalists for print, online and broadcast news outlets
Au pair Lucila Espinosa Milay checks her receipt as she walks through a row of money transfer businesses after wiring part of her paycheck to siblings back in the Philippines, at Central Station in Copenhagen, Denmark, May 21, 2016. Milay pays the school fees for several of her eight siblings back home, sending money every 15 days. Remittances are a huge economic driver in the Philippines. Image by Allison Shelley. Philippines, 2016.
September 23, 2016 / Daily Mail Ana P. Santos
On paper, the au pair program is a cultural exchange program. But for many people, the motivations are economic relief rather than cultural immersion.
Migrants at Wien Westbahnhof railway station on their way to Germany. Image by Bwag courtesy Wikimedia Commons.  Austria, 2015.
September 23, 2016 / Latterly
Laura Kasinof
Being a refugee in Europe means joy, anxiety and enduring nasty looks from the locals.
Coca leaves drying in the Chapare, Bolivia. Image by Simon Tegel.  Bolivia, 2016.
September 21, 2016 / VICE News
Simeon Tegel
By legalizing coca- the key ingredient in cocaine--Bolivia has reduced crops and narco-conflict. But Washington disapproves.
Coca leaves drying in the Chapare, Bolivia. Image by Simon Tegel.  Bolivia, 2016.
September 21, 2016 / VICE News
Simeon Tegel
By legalizing coca- the key ingredient in cocaine--Bolivia has reduced crops and narco-conflict. But Washington disapproves.
Iris-scanners like this one, attached to ATM machines at branches of Cairo Amman Bank across Jordan, allow registered refugees to access their UNHCR cash assistance and money for food assistance, issues by the World Food Program. Refugees have their iris scanned when they first register with UNHCR. This data is cross-referenced when they access their benefits through the ATMs. Image by Rachel Townzen. Jordan, 2016.
September 21, 2016 / News Deeply
Rachel Townzen
In light of the U.N. Summit for Refugees and Migrants in New York, Rachel Townzen explores what it means for Syrians and Syrian refugees to stay safe in a tech-driven world where new technologies and...
Trekking through the heart of the Darien Gap. Photo by Carlos Villalon. Colombia, 2016.
September 21, 2016 / SBS: Dateline
Jason Motlagh
What would you risk for a better life? Dateline journeys through one of the world’s most dangerous jungles, a route populated by drug traffickers, bandits and migrants searching for a new beginning.
The Dateline team pushed deeper into the Darien jungle. Image by Carlos Villalon. Colombia, 2016.
September 20, 2016 / News.com.au
Jason Motlagh
There are plenty of reasons the 150km stretch of wilderness between Colombia and Panama is known as the “world’s most dangerous journey."
A view of Baku Bay. Image by Alix Saz courtesy Creative Commons. Azerbaijan, 2015.
September 19, 2016 / PRI's The World
Joshua Kucera
Joshua Kucera explores the border between Europe and Asia, reporting here from Azerbaijan.
The town of Inuvik, from the Mackenzie River
September 18, 2016 / Motherboard | VICE
Brian Castner
The Mackenzie Delta held melting permafrost, cold cellars that won't stay cold, and, for one day at least, the warmest beach in Canada.
Mani and his girlfriend on a trip in the mountains of Pakistan. Under the umbrella, Mani is on the left and his girlfriend on the right. Image provided by: Mani. Pakistan, 2016.
September 15, 2016 / Huffington Post
Ikra Javed
A transgender man, now happily living with his girlfriend, speaks on how he got to where he is now and how trans men fit into Pakistan's discussion of trans rights for khawaja siras.
Teresa Chilkowich, of Arctic Energy Alliance, in front of the new solar panel in Jean Marie River. Image by Jean Marie River First Nation. Canada, 2016.
September 15, 2016 / Motherboard | VICE
Brian Castner
The tricky balance of diesel and solar in Canada's far north.
Syrian and Iraqi refugees arrive on the island of Lesbos. Image by Georgios Giannopoulos. Greece, 2015. Courtesy Wiki Commons.
September 15, 2016 / London Review of Books
Ben Mauk
As a part of his project exploring the impact of the refugee crisis in the EU, Ben Mauk visits Germany's post-industrial Ruhr Valley.
Wildflowers cover the scars of a forest fire near Jean Marie River, NWT. Image by Brian Castner. Canada, 2016.
September 14, 2016 / Motherboard | VICE
Brian Castner
Jim Thomasson sets fires for a living. The biggest, nastiest, hottest fires he can, and then he lets them burn. "Up here we can go to the 95th percentile, the worst conditions.”

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