Reports by Pulitzer Center journalists for print, online and broadcast news outlets
October 21, 2014 / Harper's James Harkin
How did a terror organization considered too bloody for Al Qaeda morph into something like a government with its own territory—and with troops at the border of a NATO member state?
October 19, 2014 / Mother Jones
Kalyanee Mam
A deal between a Chinese hydro company and Cambodian power brokers has put the Areng Valley at risk. Can villagers and activists save it?
October 17, 2014 / Des Moines Register
Lynn Hicks, Rodney White
"Locally grown," can be a hard sell when the Chinese government admits that nearly 20 percent of the nation's soils are polluted.
October 17, 2014 / Des Moines Register
Lynn Hicks, Rodney White
In the wake of scandals involving tainted milk, Chinese officials are pushing for U.S.-size dairy farms with thousands of cows. But consolidation has costs.
October 16, 2014 / Voice of America
Kalyanee Mam
A short film edited in remembrance of the journalist Taing Try, who was murdered this week, and the environmental issues Cambodia still faces.
October 16, 2014 / Huffington Post
Daniella Zalcman
Huffington Post's James Nichols interviews Daniella Zalcman about the role of religious leaders in Uganda's contentious LGBT debate.
October 16, 2014 / CNN
Daniella Zalcman
CNN Daisy Carrington spoke with Daniella Zalcman about her work engaging Uganda's religious leaders on sexual identity, anti-gay legislation, and their responsibilities as pastors, priests, and imams...
October 15, 2014 / Time
Misha Friedman
Yegor Guskov and Bogdan Zinchenko, who owned a gay bar in Sevastopol, feared for their business — and their family.
October 14, 2014 / Christian Science Monitor
Sara Shahriari
Two political scandals swept headlines in Bolivia recently, giving rise to protests and a campaign to publicize past misogynistic comments or policies by political candidates.
October 14, 2014 / The Washington Post
Tom Hundley, Ana P. Santos
As it stands, tens of thousands in the Philippines are stuck in difficult or dysfunctional marriages, torn between the teachings of their faith and a humiliating legal limbo.
October 14, 2014 / Des Moines Register
Lynn Hicks, Rodney White
Chinese agriculture, long dominated by lawn-sized plots of land harvested by hand, is rapidly growing larger. These big dreams mean big opportunities for U.S. and Iowa agribusinesses.
October 13, 2014 / Des Moines Register
Lynn Hicks, Rodney White
Corn — not rice or wheat — is the largest crop in China, and the country has a glut of the grain now. But more corn doesn't equal more food security, experts argue.
October 13, 2014 / Des Moines Register
Lynn Hicks, Rodney White
Chinese hog farms were notoriously inefficient, unsafe and environmentally damaging. Can they change to compete with U.S. pork producers?

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