Reports by Pulitzer Center journalists for print, online and broadcast news outlets
Sources interviewed in Khartoum describe signs of what they see as a pending relaxation of economic sanctions against the North African country, which has been subject to a comprehensive U.S. trade embargo for nearly 20 years. Image by Kira Zalan. Sudan, 2016.
January 18, 2017 / PRI's The World Kira Zalan
A new de-radicalization program provides a window into Sudan's efforts to fight extremism, while maintaining legitimacy with its Islamist base.
An English language school in San Salvador, called EnglishCool. Its founder, Eddie Anzora, prepares students for work in the call centers. Image by Jonathan Blitzer. El Salvador, 2016.
January 16, 2017 / The New Yorker
Jonathan Blitzer
How American immigration policy has fueled an unlikely industry in El Salvador.
A North Korean citizen enjoying herself at a shooting range in Pyongyang. Image by Laya Maheshwari. North Korea, 2016.
January 16, 2017 / Fandor
Laya Maheshwari
In 1962, an American soldier defected to North Korea. He's still there. This documentary tells his story.
The author Tan Hecheng stands on "Widow's Bridge," where dozens of people were clubbed to death and thrown into the river in a wave of genocide that took place in 1967. These sorts of hidden histories still haunt the new superpower. Image by Sim Chi Yin/ VII Photo Agency. China, 2016.
January 13, 2017 / The New York Review of Books
Ian Johnson
Put your butcher's sword down! Latest in my series of Q&As with leading Chinese thinkers about China's past, present and future. I traveled to rural China with Tan to look at the scene of a...
Image by Misha Friedman. South Africa, 2016.
January 13, 2017 /
kem knapp sawyer, Jordan Roth
Pulitzer Center launches its newest e-book: To End Aids featuring stories, photographs and video by our grantees. Also included: a timeline, interactive maps, a glossary, and resources.
A church in Singapore where some migrant workers worship. Image by Xyza Bacani. Singapore, 2016.
January 12, 2017 / The New York Times
Xyza Bacani
Migrant workers are invisible people,We are like air. People need us but they don’t see us. We exist to please them, to serve them, but they don’t really see us as part of the society.
Cherries, the fruit of the coffee tree, generally contain two coffee beans--actually two seeds, each with one flat side--inside. Tanzania is famous for its peaberry coffee, produced by a rare mutation that creates only a single seed with no flat part. Image by Dan Grossman. Tanzania, 2016.
January 11, 2017 / WBUR
Dan Grossman
Global warming is heating things up, causing all sorts of problems — including for coffee growers. In northern Tanzania, growers are finding weather conditions increasingly unsuitable.
A young Syrian refugee packs tea boxes under a table in a Turkish factory near his refugee camp on the Turkey-Syria border.
January 10, 2017 / WNYC Radio
Malia Politzer, Emily Kassie
Journalists Malia Politzer and Emily Kassie discuss their project in the HuffingtonPost Highline, “The 21st Century Gold Rush: How the refugee crisis is changing the world economy."
Interactive visualization on nuclear power reactor construction. A special issue of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientist.
January 10, 2017 / Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists
Rachel Bronson, John Mecklin
Nuclear power advocates claim that nuclear power is essential for a low-carbon future, but critics say otherwise.
Guns line the wall of a private military company training centre in Hereford. Image by Matt Kennard. England, 2016.
January 10, 2017 / The Guardian
Matt Kennard
With the SAS based nearby, this picturesque city has a long military history. Now Hereford is formalizing its place as a center for a controversial industry which boomed during the ‘war on terror'.
January 9, 2017 / New Security Beat
Nikita Sampath
Rising sea levels and intense cyclones have turned the drinking water saline in coastal Bangladesh. The villagers cope the best they can.
@Jostfranko follows the path of cotton from growers and harvesters in Burkina Faso to production in Bangladesh and Romania, and finally Western Europe in the form of retail garments. Image by Jost Franko. 2016.
January 9, 2017 / Open Society Foundation
Jošt Franko, Meta Krese
Open Society Foundations instagram takeover with the Global supply chain of cotton industry project
The homes of Mount Carmel farmworkers were also destroyed by fire in August 2009. Image courtesy of Ben Freeth. Zimbabwe, 2009.
January 7, 2017 / The Telegraph
Martin Fletcher
Eight years after Robert Mugabe's war veterans seized his family's farm, Ben Freeth returns to find it desolate and abandoned.

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