World Focus

South Yemeni separatists continue agitating for secession

The southern parts of Yemen were part of the independent, pro-Soviet nation of South Yemen until 1994.

In these southern provinces, opposition to the central government is growing. Some fear that the rebellion may be turning more violent and that increasing instability in the fragile nation could create room for Al-Qaeda to grow.

Supported by the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting, freelance reporter Paul Stephens reports on the latest developments from Sana'a, Yemen.

Artcirq video

Linda Matchan and Michele McDonald's Artcirq video airs on Worldfocus on Tuesday February 23.

Canada's Nunavut territory covers about two million square kilometers and comprises a fifth of Canadian territory. It's home to about 29,000 people, mostly Inuit. Along with their proud heritage and striking landscapes, residents struggle with unemployment, poverty and cultural dislocation. Suicide rates among Inuit youth are ten times higher than the national average.

South Sudan makes some progress amid possibility of war

As our white Toyota land cruiser drove on the freshly laid road from the market town of Akon towards Ariang village, we noticed something far on the horizon. Maybe…cows? Trees in the distance?

As we got closer, we saw it was a huge crowd of people. It was difficult to ascertain just how many with the dust cloud they were kicking up, their feet (either bare or shod in plastic sandals) pounding the red-dirt road as they ran, singing and dancing, toward our vehicle.

Michael Kavanagh Discusses the Problems Afflicting the DRC

Contributor Michael J. Kavanagh reported for Worldfocus last year on the crisis in eastern Congo. He's currently based in the DR Congo's capital, Kinshasa.

He discusses the controversy surrounding the United Nations' peacekeeping mission, the problems with integration of rebels into Congolese Army ranks and the economic future of this resource-rich, war-torn country.

Q: Why has the UN's peacekeeping mission come under such intense criticism in eastern Congo?

Ethnicity still divides Bosnia

More than a dozen years have passed since Bosnia and Herzegovina's bloody civil war ended. Although the country has repaired physically, its citizens are experiencing political and social challenges. Special correspondent Kira Kay examines political instability in Bosnia 14 years after the end of a brutal civil war that resulted in the deaths of 100,000 people.

Crumbling security situation further cripples DR Congo

Journalist Michael J. Kavanagh reported on the Crisis in Congo for Worldfocus last year. He's currently based in the DR Congo's capital Kinshasa and gives Daljit Dhaliwal an update on the civil war that continues to cripple the country. He says the security situation is the worst he has seen in the last decade.

Ida's Story

Ida Northover is a volunteer community leader battling stigma and discrimination in one of the poorest inner city communities on the outskirts of Kingston, Jamaica.

Bangladesh Reels from the Impact of Climate Change

Last year, rising tides destroyed more than 300 schools in Bangladesh leaving children with no place to learn. In response to the worsening floods, social entrepreneur Mohammed Rezwan created 28 "school boats" to bring school to Bangladeshi children. Rezwan, NGOs and governments in poorer countries are trying to address the impacts of climate change now.

Souls, Sacrilege and Salvation

The Reverend Robert Griffin leads a secret church that is welcoming to gay men and women in Jamaica. He believes that religion is at the heart of Jamaica culture of homophobia and the time has come to reinterpret the Bible for modern times.

Violence and Venom

Jamaica may be one of the most violently homophobic societies in the world. This piece explores the dark side of Jamaica's culture of anti-gay violence and attitudes and explores the ideological beliefs that perpetuate it.

Guatemala's Children Languish from Malnutrition

More than two million Guatemalans live in extreme poverty, and nearly half of the children in Guatemala are malnourished. In some areas, nearly every child is affected.

Most suffer from chronic malnutrition, which means that while they are getting enough calories, the food they eat is severely lacking in vitamins and protein.

As Samuel Loewenberg reports, this poor nutrition affects not only their bodies, but their future.