Publications

PBS NewsHour

Kenya: Sanitation in the Slums

On Wednesday, April 14, PBS NewsHour aired Fred de Sam Lazaro's latest story from Kenya: a report on social entrepreneur and Acumen Fund founder Jacqueline Novogratz. She's developed a new idea called "patient capital", that is funding innovative approaches in tackling some of the worlds most entrenched social problems. Also, a look at one man's vision for cleaner and greener public toilets in Kenya. It's part one of a two part series.

In South Sudan, Vote to Secede Looms

As Sudan gears up for Sunday's national elections, another landmark vote is on the horizon -- a referendum in January that will determine whether the south splits from the north.

Like the elections, the referendum is a key requirement of the 2005 Comprehensive Peace Agreement, intended to give southerners a chance to decide if they will remain in a unity government with the north, or become an independent country.

But several major related issues are still up in the air, including where the north-south border actually is.

"Voices From Abyei, Sudan"

The village of Abyei had a population of about 30,000 when, in May 2008, violence broke out between government forces from the north and soldiers from the south, leveling the town and forcing the residents to flee to surrounding areas.

In the months since, the residents have been gradually moving back and rebuilding their lives. We spoke with some of the villagers and recorded their thoughts in the following Flipcam videos.

Sudanese Youth Describes Life in Contested Town

In May 2008, long-simmering tensions between the Sudan People's Liberation Army of the south and government forces from the north boiled over into violent clashes in the town of Abyei, causing an estimated 25,000 people to flee their homes.

They are gradually moving back to Abyei, located along the north-south border of Sudan. And efforts are underway to rebuild the town, including repairing roads and replacing the mud and thatched roof homes, known as tukuls. But still there are large swaths of barren land.

Guinea Worm on Brink of Eradication in Sudan

Decades of civil war in southern Sudan has have hindered the population's access to clean water and allowed some parasites to persist. But international efforts have made headway on one particular scourge: the guinea worm. Fred de Sam Lazaro reports from Sudan.

The piece aired on PBS NewsHour April 7, 2010.

Sudan Heads Toward Historic But Shaky Vote

Sudan's first multi-party presidential and parliamentary elections in 24 years are set for April 11, but with just days to go, the main opposition presidential candidate has withdrawn from the race, throwing the legitimacy of the election into question.

The elections are mandated under the 2005 Comprehensive Peace Agreement, which ended two decades of civil war between the primarily Muslim and Arab-speaking north and rebels in the south. Another requirement of the CPA is a referendum in January 2011 in which the south will decide whether to split from the north.

Wells in Ethiopia Draw on Community Support

In Ethiopia, where lack of access to water is a significant issue, aid groups have found that local involvement in establishing water wells betters the chances that they will last. Fred de Sam Lazaro reports on these community-based initiatives, especially their impact on women.

This piece is part of a reporting collaboration on water issues in east Africa between NewsHour and the Pulitzer Center.

Children in Sudan Rely on Field Hospital for Food

In February, NewsHour special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro and producer Nicole See visited a Doctors Without Borders hospital in a remote part of southern Sudan, where patients often walk for miles to get treatment. NewsHour correspondent Larisa Epatko reports on Fred and Nicole's trip.

Africa Analyst: Elections 'Tall Task' in Sudan

As presidential elections and a vote on north-south succession approach, Zach Vertin of the International Crisis Group sat down with NewsHour special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro in Sudan to discuss the challenges the country still faces. NewsHour correspondent Larisa Epatko reports on their meeting.

"Despite Years of Crushing Poverty, Hope Grows in Haiti" on PBS NewsHour

Kira Kay and Jason Maloney report on what is being hailed as a moment of hope for Haiti, as a confluence of security, brought by a large and aggressive United Nations presence, and relative political stability, under the tenure of President Rene Preval, has kept the country calm for a long-enough period that investors are tentatively starting to return to the Caribbean nation.