July 8, 2014 / Foreign Policy
Yigal Schleifer
As Hungary's populist right-wing government fights off its challenger from the extreme right, culture and historical memory have become the battleground.
July 3, 2014 / Foreign Policy
Kenneth R. Weiss
Rising sea levels will displace millions of people over the next century. In Bangladesh, the mass migration has already begun.
June 26, 2014 / Foreign Policy
Jenna Krajeski
In the refugee camps of Iraqi Kurdistan, the insurgents are not often what they seem.
September 5, 2012 / Foreign Policy
Tom Hundley
While the U.S. and much of the rest of the world are focused on thwarting Iran's threat to build a nuclear weapon, the real danger may the full-throttle arms nuclear race between Pakistan and India.
August 23, 2012 / Foreign Policy
Anna Nemtsova
How corruption and greed are destroying the architectural treasures of Nizhny Novgorod.
August 23, 2012 / Foreign Policy
Anna Nemtsova
For Anna Nemtsova, a Persephone Miel Fellow at the Pulitzer Center, preserving Nizhny Novgorod's historic center is a personal mission.
August 13, 2012 / Foreign Policy
Anna Badkhen
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, PTSD, has become the signature injury of America's wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. But what about the people who live in those places. Can an entire country have PTSD?
August 10, 2012 / Foreign Policy
Tom Hundley
The U.S. opened the door to nuclear trade with India -- and got nothing.
July 11, 2012 / Foreign Policy
Peter Chilson
Mali's fabled Timbuktu is no stranger to siege and ruin but has also been the focus of a recent rebirth in music and arts. The Islamist rebels occupying the city put all of that at risk - and more.
July 10, 2012 / Foreign Policy
Trevor Snapp
Refugees in the Nuba Mountains now face a more dangerous weapon than war itself: hunger.
July 10, 2012 / Foreign Policy
Alan Boswell
Inside the high-profile campaign by Washington politicians, NGO do-gooders, and celebrities to create an independent South Sudan--whether it's a disaster or not.
June 29, 2012 / Foreign Policy
Peter DiCampo
Are things so bad that Ivory Coast misses its former tyrant?
June 29, 2012 / Foreign Policy
Austin Merrill
Former Ivory Coast president Laurent Gbagbo, facing trial in The Hague, still has support despite allegations of war crimes.

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