February 26, 2015 / Foreign Policy
Caryle Murphy
Is King Salman's new court a breath of fresh air—or is it reactionaries looking to take the country back in time?
February 26, 2015 / Foreign Policy
Ty McCormick
Less than three years after independence, South Sudan collapsed into bloody civil war. Could the United States, a crucial backer of the young African state, have prevented the violence?
February 8, 2015 / Foreign Policy
Dimiter Kenarov
No tourists, frightened Tatars, and Russians have taken all the jobs. Welcome to Crimea in winter.
March 18, 2014 / Foreign Policy
Dimiter Kenarov, Boryana Katsarova
Intimate images from Crimea's referendum on independence. Most of the world condemned the vote as illegitimate.
March 17, 2014 / Foreign Policy
Dimiter Kenarov, Boryana Katsarova
Life imitates art in Crimea, where nothing seems real anymore except the tears and the vodka.
March 15, 2014 / Foreign Policy
Dimiter Kenarov, Boryana Katsarova
The motley Tatar self-defense units of Crimea anxiously patrol a homeland they fear will be ripped from them once again.
March 11, 2014 / Foreign Policy
Dimiter Kenarov, Boryana Katsarova
The last stand of Crimea’s pro-Ukraine movement.
March 6, 2014 / Foreign Policy
Dimiter Kenarov, Boryana Katsarova
The angry Russian pensioners of Simferopol would rather have the old Soviet dictatorship than European democracy.
February 12, 2014 / Foreign Policy
Tom Hundley
In Indonesia and the Philippines, abortions take place underground. The social costs of these women's secrets can be crushing.
January 23, 2014 / Foreign Policy
Jeffrey E. Stern
A recent attack on a restaurant favored by foreigners in Afghanistan represents a strategic error for the Taliban.
January 21, 2014 / Foreign Policy
Jeffrey E. Stern
With elections set to determine who will lead Afghanistan after foreign troops withdraw, the government had a plan to ensure legitimacy. Read about how it's been undone by a technicality.
January 9, 2014 / Foreign Policy
Jeffrey E. Stern
An Afghan drug counselor: The sixth in a series of oral histories from Afghans preparing for life after December 2014, when U.S. and NATO combat troops will leave the country.
December 21, 2013 / Foreign Policy
Anna Nemtsova
This month Putin surprised even the biggest Russia experts: he pardoned his biggest enemy and critic Mikhail Khodorkovsky. There were some surprises for Putin too from crises regions.

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