September 20, 2013 / Christian Science Monitor
Jacob Kushner
In Congo, Chinese are settling in with businesses and bargains that locals love. At one copper smelting plant, Chinese and locals work together but live apart.
May 29, 2013 / Christian Science Monitor
Allison Shelley, Allyn Gaestel
In a forgotten fold of mountains in rural Nepal, an idealistic group of American doctors is experimenting with full transparency. From these remote corners, transparency is tricky.
March 5, 2013 / Christian Science Monitor
Allyn Gaestel, Allison Shelley
Changing engrained social practices, like chaupadi, is never as simple as an activist campaign.
February 12, 2013 / Christian Science Monitor
Jason Motlagh
Malaysian wildlife officials say 14 dead pygmy elephants were found last month in Borneo, apparently poisoned by chemicals used by farmers on the country's massive palm-oil plantations.
December 3, 2012 / Christian Science Monitor
William Wheeler
Reporter William Wheeler talks about water stress from the high Himalayas to Haiti.
November 7, 2012 / Christian Science Monitor, Untold Stories
Robert Marquand
A family’s reverse migration transforms a Polish mountain spa resort as well as the attitudes of local residents.
November 6, 2012 / Christian Science Monitor, Untold Stories
Robert Marquand
One of the clearest illustrations of “brain gain” in Poland comes from the southern city of Krakow, which is experiencing a mini-boom in information technology.
November 1, 2012 / Christian Science Monitor, Untold Stories
Peter Ford
Pollution of Lake Tai in Wuxi city puts off potential traders and investors.
October 31, 2012 / Christian Science Monitor, Untold Stories
Peter Ford
China is trying to tempt foreign-educated Chinese entrepreneurs and scientists to return home. The biggest obstacle? China's deep fear of failure.
October 21, 2012 / Christian Science Monitor
Sara Miller Llana, Robert Marquand, Peter Ford
The tide of brain drain – from developing countries to industrialized nations – has turned. Human capital is now returning home to Asia, Latin America, Eastern Europe, and Africa.
October 21, 2012 / Christian Science Monitor
Peter Ford
Chinese who found it hard to fit in at the water cooler abroad feel newly valued at home as China creates a reverse brain drain by using financial incentives to lure native talent back home.
October 21, 2012 / Christian Science Monitor
Robert Marquand
In the global reverse brain drain, Poles returning home influence their sometimes frumpy, provincial homeland in everything from toilets to insurance coverage and workplace attitudes.
October 19, 2012 / Christian Science Monitor
Sara Miller Llana
Reverse brain drain means twofold "brain gain" for Brazil as the global recession pulls native Brazilians home and, with them, a wave of European migrants leaving their austerity stricken homelands.

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