Publications

CBC Radio

Gadhafi's Legacy to Africa

The collapse of the Qaddafi regime delights many Libyans but holds the risk of ongoing instability for much of the rest of the region as mercenaries he recruited are deserting him and heading home.

Nepal's Maoist Rebels

The uneasy co-existence of a Maoist rebel army and the national army leaves Nepal and its neighbors on edge.

Maternal Mortality in India: Hanna Ingber

Freelance journalist Hanna Ingber Win's photos, from the tea gardens of Assam, India. Assam has India's highest maternal mortality rate. Hanna went there to interview families who'd lost their mothers, and health care workers who try to help pregnant mothers get the medical help they need.

Life beyond birth, India

If Sulekha Lohar had only had access to an ambulance instead of that handcart.

If the clinic just had a doctor, instead of just empty shelves.

If the hospital only had a bloodbank, as we hear from American journalist Hanna Ingber Win, Sulekha's children might still have their Mother.

Also, a troubling closeup on reproductive health in one small part of the developing world there from Hanna, who specialises in maternal mortality reporting.

CBC Radio interviews Vanessa Gezari

While the White House considers whether to send more American troops into Afghanistan, it's also being asked to send in more anthropologists and social scientists.

They're part of an experiment to help U.S. forces understand the place and the people they're dealing with.

Civillian academics are embedded with front-line soldiers to advise on local customs and politics.

It's called "The Human Terrain System" and it began in Iraq two years ago. Not everyone approves. And it's not without dangers. Three of them have been killed in action.

No News is Bad News

Sitting, waiting, sweating. When you live on the margins in Sudan, there's nothing much behind you, and nothing much in front to look forward to.

And get over any romantic notions about hardy stoic villagers. The people of the Nubian desert tell us they don't like it. And they gather each day in their homes made of mud to share tea and some grinding certainties.