Launched May 10, 2012 Joshua Kucera
Oil in the Caspian Sea is making Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan and Turkmenistan rich. But with Iran and Russia on the sea, too, is it fueling a naval arms race as well?
Launched May 7, 2012 Austin Merrill, Peter DiCampo
In Ivory Coast—the world’s top cocoa producer—cocoa farmers bore the brunt of a civil war that killed thousands and displaced more than a million. A year after a power transfer, has anything changed?
Launched May 4, 2012 Tim Rogers
Back in power since 2007, Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega is leading what he claims is a “second phase of the Sandinista revolution.” Some fear Nicaragua is repeating a cycle of social unrest.
Launched May 4, 2012 James Whitlow Delano
Suriname, with its pristine environment, has become a pawn in a new Great Game as the balance of power in the Americas shifts from the United States toward China.
Launched May 2, 2012 Peter Chilson
Europeans drew Africa’s borders long ago. Today these lines are often deserted and sometimes dangerous. Mali is the legacy: A crumbling state, rump of ancient empire between desert and forest.
Launched April 27, 2012 Eliza Griswold, Seamus Murphy
Anonymous and spoken, landai, two-line Pashtun poems, have served for centuries as a means of self-expression for women. Today they are an important vehicle of public dissent.
Launched April 17, 2012 Trevor Snapp, Alan Boswell
An immersive, transmedia book project for the iPad on the birth of the world's newest country from photographer Trevor Snapp and reporter Alan Boswell.
Launched April 16, 2012 Tomas van Houtryve
With the same ruthless skill it uses to keep its population in check, North Korea also keeps journalists in the dark. But much can be learned from the outside looking in.
Launched April 10, 2012 Simeon Tegel
From Tijuana to Tierra del Fuego, climate change is gripping Latin America. Simeon Tegel reports on the human consequences of drought, hurricanes, and melting glaciers.
Launched April 4, 2012 Keyla Beebe
Despite environmental protection policies, Cambodia’s growing economy and population have caused one of the world’s worst rates of deforestation.
Launched April 4, 2012 Tim Judah
Scotland is set for a vote on independence. It is expected to take place in 2014, meaning that the United Kingdom could be dissolved in 2015. Tim Judah looks at defense and foreign policy implications.
Launched March 28, 2012 David Conrad, Micah Albert
Nairobi’s Dandora Municipal Dump Site has been officially "full" for years and is implicated in a host of diseases--yet provides employment to scavengers. Views from the dump and from those nearby.
Cynthia Desert, 13, and her mother outside their home.
Launched March 12, 2012 Kem Knapp Sawyer
Across the world more attention needs to be focused on children's needs so that girls as well as boys will attend school and learn to read, and that all will have safe water and access to healthcare.
Launched March 9, 2012 Ansel Herz
UN peacekeepers have been stationed throughout Haiti to help stabilize the country and protect Haitians. But repeated allegations of human rights abuses have sent their popularity to an all-time low.
Launched March 9, 2012 Stephanie Hanes, Greg Constantine
From the slums of Nairobi to the sugar plantations of the Dominican Republic to the far reaches of Bangladesh, entire communities live without citizenship rights. They are “the stateless”.
Launched February 26, 2012 Joshua Yaffa
Popular demonstrations against the rule of Vladimir Putin are sweeping across Russia. Will the demands of the middle class protesters force Putin to liberalize—or keep him from returning to power?
Launched February 26, 2012 Joanne Silberner
More people in poor countries die from cancer than from HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria combined. Joanne Silberner looks at the human toll of cancer, and possible solutions.
Launched February 21, 2012 Ricci Shryock
Senegal’s hip-hop artists are voicing their nation’s anger and leading a movement to stop President Abdoulaye Wade from staging what they say is a constitutional coup.
Launched February 16, 2012 Bobby Bascomb
The Sahara is steadily advancing south into the Sahel region of Africa, but leaders of 11 African nations hope to plant a Great Green Wall of trees to block the world’s largest desert.
Launched February 15, 2012 William Sands
With access to Equatorial Guinea normally tightly controlled by the government, a showcase soccer tournament gives a rare glimpse of life in a rich country wracked by poverty.
Launched February 13, 2012 Jessie Deeter, Rob Peterson
On the one-year anniversary of the Tunisian revolution, a nation struggles with the transition from autocracy to democracy in the face of growing unemployment and religious conservatism.
Launched January 23, 2012 Samuel Agyemang, Peter Sawyer
In Accra, capital of Ghana, residents cope with water scarcity while the state water company rakes in cash from abroad.
Launched January 17, 2012 Sonia Shah
Overuse of antibiotics and poor sanitation in India have created a powerful new antibiotic-resistant superbug, which has spread to a dozen countries, thanks in part to medical tourism.
Launched January 4, 2012 Yochi Dreazen
U.S. officials believe Iran’s ongoing progress towards a nuclear weapon is pushing Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Egypt and Turkey to follow suit, raising the odds of an Arab nuclear arms race.

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