Projects

Launched May 20, 2019 Amit Madheshiya, Shirley Abraham
Returning home after buying two milch cows, dairy farmer Rakbar Khan was lynched by a mob of “cow vigilantes”. His wife seeks meaning in mourning his death, while his perpetrators deny it.
Launched May 2, 2019 Jonathan Custodio
Veracruz is home to hundreds of thousands of Afro-Mexicans. In 2015, they were officially recognized in the National Census. What's happened since?
Launched May 2, 2019 Monika Bulaj
Monika Bulaj is producing a visual atlas of threatened minorities and shared holy places. 
Launched April 24, 2019 Aldem Bourscheit, Fabio Nascimento
A six-month transnational investigation into the economic and political drivers of violence against environmental defenders in seven countries of Latin America.
Launched April 20, 2019 Nash Landesman
Upgrading the Panama Canal may have increased safety risks.
Launched April 17, 2019 Nina Jankowicz
Ukraine—the home of Europe’s hot war, and the Petri dish where Russian information operations are tested—holds a consequential presidential election in spring 2019.
Launched April 10, 2019 Sarah Hoenicke
Since Sri Lanka's brutal civil war ended, writers are exploring reconciliation through narrative.
Launched March 30, 2019 Perla Trevizo
How a cycle of debt and increased enforcement is leaving a void in some rural Guatemalan schools and villages.
Launched March 25, 2019 Simon Ostrovsky
Church parishes throughout Ukraine are voting to no longer recognize Moscow's authority as Russia blames the U.S. for meddling in Orthodox affairs, raising tensions ahead of elections.
Launched March 25, 2019 Mark Hoffman, Rick Barrett
Dairy farms—Wisconsin's economic engines—have been decimated in recent years due to decreased demand, lack of workers, and slumping milk prices.
Launched March 19, 2019 Iris Zaki
What happens when a left-leaning Israeli filmmaker settles in a West-Bank settlement?
Launched March 19, 2019 Amy Olejniczak, Rachel Layko
The Pulitzer Center and the College of William & Mary partner again to provide students with deeper global learning and reporting experiences.
Launched March 15, 2019 Cammie Behnke
Twenty-five years after the 1994 genocide, Rwanda has been labeled a champion for women's rights. What's changed? What work still needs to be done to ensure gender equality in a post-genocide era?
Launched March 5, 2019 Ben Mauk
In the Caucasus mountains, members of the most scattered people in the world—the Circassians—are starting to come home following a decade of concerted online activism.
Launched February 28, 2019 Rebecca Plevin, Omar Ornelas
For decades, people have migrated from the Mexican state of Guerrero for economic reasons. But now, people are leaving Guerrero not to improve their lives, but to save their lives.
Launched February 28, 2019 April Reese
As 88 miles of President Trump’s border wall go up in South Texas, scientists and local residents fear that the unique ecosystems and nature-based economy of the Lower Rio Grande Valley will suffer.
Launched February 27, 2019 William H. Freivogel
Liberal and conservative justices criticize abuses of civil asset forfeiture. Groups from CATO to the ACLU do too. Republicans and Democrats want change, but much of the reform agenda is unfinished.
Launched February 21, 2019 Yuhong Pang, Robert Tokanel
“She’s Not a Boy” is the story of Tatenda Ngwaru, an asylum-seeking intersex woman who fled Zimbabwe with sixty dollars and the hope that she would finally find a place where she belonged.
Launched February 19, 2019 Merdie Nzanga
Is the 2011 federal Prohibition of FGM Act in Kenya enough to end the practice of female genital mutilation? FGM is deeply rooted in Kenyan cultures, and critics say the law is not enough.
Launched February 14, 2019 Mauricio Lima, Jonathan Blitzer
Jonathan Blitzer, a staff writer for The New Yorker, and documentary photographer Mauricio Lima traveled to Guatemala in order to report on the "push" factors driving people to migrate.
Launched February 14, 2019 Kimberly Dozier
Will the continued suffering of ISIS's victims result in a resurgence of the terror group? 
Launched February 12, 2019 Nadja Drost, Bruno Federico
With self-declared interim president Juan Guaido challenging to take the presidency from Maduro, how will the country overcome its deepest political impasse yet?
Launched February 8, 2019 Alice Su, Sara Hylton
What do Afghan and Pakistani women see as the roots of violent extremism, and how are some of them working together to build peace? Who are the women who are fighting to be more than mere victims?
Launched February 7, 2019 Zoë Carpenter
In Ecuador, the prosecution of women for abortion-related crimes is escalating, with devastating consequences.