Project

Honduras: Fighting Malnutrition

Nestled in a remote northern Honduras valley, Santa Lucia and the surrounding area are home to 20,000 rural inhabitants. These families rely solely on their agrarian skills for a subsistent living.

According to UNICEF, over one-third of Honduran infants are malnourished due to this indigenous lifestyle. Four percent of Honduran children die before reaching five years of age, at a rate five times higher than that of U.S.

Shoulder to Shoulder, a non-profit organization based in Honduras, is combating youth malnourishment by providing lunch daily to 2,000 children. Their health clinics also provide 24-hour support for the indigenous people, offering preventative medicine, primary care and emergency support.

Multimedia producer Tracy Boyer documents Shoulder to Shoulder's work and how U.S. physicians, medical students and other volunteers are battling health and hunger issues in this rural region.

Honduras: The Cost of Care

After speaking with the mayor of Santa Lucia and several locals about Shoulder to Shoulder, it is evident that mis-communication between the locals and the non-profit has caused recent strife in the community.

Shoulder to Shoulder currently operates seven clinics throughout the southern region of Intibuca, six of which are primary health centers owned by the Honduran government. These centers run under the government's standardized healthcare system and charge five lempira per visit, the equivalent of 25 cents.

Honduras: Reporting Amidst A Military Coup

Working in the midst of a military coup brings unexpected hardships. The Honduran government has shut off power across the entire country on numerous occasions, trying to squelch any outgoing or incoming information on Manuel Zelaya, the ousted president. One power outage lasted nearly 24 hours, preceded by a series of five brief outages. Interestingly enough, as I sit here and write this, the power has once again been shut off.

Honduras: What's in the Water?

Friday morning I headed out early with a team of health professionals to observe a community clinic. Many places are so rural in this part of Honduras that people rely on Shoulder to Shoulder health workers to travel to them every three months or so and set up makeshift clinics in schools and churches.

Honduras: Not So Sweet

Santa Lucia is hidden deep in the mountain range of southwestern Honduras. I traveled for eight hours by car from the San Pedro Sula airport to Santa Lucia, a tiny community in the remote region of Intibuca. The gravel road hugged the mountainous terrain as we weaved up, around, and down. Pot holes and washed-out areas from torrential rains created a nearly impassable road. The recent 7.2 earthquake that struck Honduras crumbled many of the bridges, leaving only holes in its wake.

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