Image by Juan Herrero. Rwanda, 2015.
Launched April 9, 2015 Tik Root, Juan Herrero
More than twenty years after a genocide, a look at the next generation of Rwandans and their place in a rapidly changing country.
Launched April 8, 2015 M. Sophia Newman
There's a method to stopping gun violence before it starts--and it has worked in seven countries. Can the method be modified to prevent sexual violence?
Image by Cameron Conaway. India, 2013.
Launched April 7, 2015 Cameron Conaway
India has declared 2015-2016 as Jal Kranti Varsh, or Water Revolution Year. What will this mean for the Ganges, the country’s most sacred and notoriously polluted river?
Launched April 7, 2015 Matt Kennard, Claire Provost
Aid agencies and NGOs are increasingly partnering with large corporations. Is this the answer to global development in the 21st century—or is it just corporate welfare for the One Percent?
Launched March 29, 2015 Michael Edison Hayden, Sami Siva
The India-Pakistan border overflows with heroin. Journalist Michael Edison Hayden and photographer Sami Siva report from the afflicted communities to find out what, if anything, can be done about it.
Launched March 28, 2015 Michael Scott Moore
Journalist Michael Scott Moore was held hostage for 32 months by Somali pirates. He is recovering. Will Somalia ever recover?
Launched March 26, 2015 Matt Black
On September 26, 2014, 43 Mexican students went missing in Iguala, a mountain town in the state of Guerrero. This project explores the long-term issues that gave rise to these events.
Image by Jeneen Interlandi. Hungary, 2014.
Launched March 21, 2015 Jeneen Interlandi
A string of courtroom victories have promised to bring an end to school segregation for Roma students. But implementing those legal decisions has proven as difficult as changing cultural attitudes.
Image by Lauren Gelfond. Jordan, 2014.
Launched March 12, 2015 Lauren Gelfond Feldinger
Syrian and other international volunteers travel at their own expense to Syrian refugee neighborhoods to teach war-traumatized children that they are not "the lost generation" but future peace-makers.
Launched March 5, 2015 Hannah Berk, Akshay Deverakonda
The Pulitzer Center and The College of William & Mary continue their unique initiative to provide deeper global learning and storytelling experiences for students.
Launched March 3, 2015 Spike Johnson
In Myanmar the use of child soldiers remains commonplace but under increasing international pressure small numbers of them are being released from service, returning to parents who thought them dead.
Launched March 2, 2015 Daniella Zalcman
For 120 years, the Canadian government operated a network of Indian Residential Schools that were meant to assimilate young indigenous students into Canadian culture. The results were devastating.
Launched February 25, 2015 Tim McGirk, Jason Motlagh
After dozens of vaccination workers were killed in Afghanistan, polio once again began to spread into the borderlands. The same strain is now re-surfacing in Syria.
Image by Kenneth R. Weiss. Kiribati, 2014.
Launched February 22, 2015 Kenneth R. Weiss
As the low-lying island nation of Kiribati edges closer to a climate change end game, what will happen to its people, its territory, its sovereignty?
Launched February 19, 2015 George Butler
What happens when after 13 years a foreign fighting force pulls out of a country and the world turns its attention elsewhere. Life goes on, of course, but what does this look like in Afghanistan?
Launched January 27, 2015 John Fitzgerald, Matthew Niederhauser
The Megacity Initiative is a new media venture investigating the sustainable development of burgeoning urban centers around the world in order to more prudently integrate future city dwellers.
Launched January 25, 2015 Sim Chi Yin, Ian Johnson
Living beneath Beijing's skyscrapers and residential blocks are an estimated 1 million migrant workers. Dubbed the "Rat Tribe", these low-wage workers make a home in windowless basement cubicles.
Image by Eric Halperin. Guatemala, 2015.
Launched January 21, 2015 Eric Halperin
The level of contamination in Guatemala’s Lake Atitlán has been rising for the past few decades. Not enough is being done to stop it. Some fishermen who make only $8 a day are cleaning it, for free.
Launched January 20, 2015 Katherine Blunt
Organic and fair trade coffee producers in the Western Highlands of Guatemala can earn more than conventional growers. This project explores the costs and benefits of obtaining these certifications.
Image by Allison Shelley. Haiti, 2015.
Launched January 13, 2015 Allison Shelley
Canaan, a patch of scrubby hillside just outside of Haiti’s capital, has become home to almost 100,000 displaced residents. But is it destined to be a promised land or the country’s biggest slum?
Launched January 4, 2015 Brian Castner, Cheryl Hatch
To assist Liberia in containing Ebola, the US turned to its soldiers from Iraq and Afghanistan from the most battle-hardened unit in the US Army. How does an infantry division fight a disease?
Launched January 4, 2015 Jennifer Gonzalez, Luke Nozicka
As teen pregnancy rates are slowly decreasing in the United States, rates in the Dominican Republic are double the world average, with 1 of 10 teen girls becoming pregnant in 2013.
Launched December 29, 2014 Jessie Li
China has committed to nine years of education for all children, but students with physical disabilities often confront discrimination. How do these students access education?
Launched December 22, 2014 Katie Mathieson
Patagonia, a region shared by Argentina and Chile, is well known for its unparalled panoramic views, unblemished status and remoteness. What will be the impact of a mega-project for dam construction?

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