Image by Kenneth R. Weiss. Kiribati, 2014.
Launched October 22, 2015 Kenneth R. Weiss
As the low-lying island nation of Kiribati edges closer to a climate change end game, what will happen to its people, its territory, its sovereignty?
Image by Allison Shelley. Haiti, 2015.
Launched January 13, 2015 Allison Shelley
Canaan, a patch of scrubby hillside just outside of Haiti’s capital, has become home to almost 100,000 displaced residents. But is it destined to be a promised land or the country’s biggest slum?
Launched January 4, 2015 Brian Castner, Cheryl Hatch
To assist Liberia in containing Ebola, the US turned to its soldiers from Iraq and Afghanistan from the most battle-hardened unit in the US Army. How does an infantry division fight a disease?
Launched January 4, 2015 Jennifer Gonzalez, Luke Nozicka
As teen pregnancy rates are slowly decreasing in the United States, rates in the Dominican Republic are double the world average, with 1 of 10 teen girls becoming pregnant in 2013.
Launched December 29, 2014 Jessie Li
China has committed to nine years of education for all children, but students with physical disabilities often confront discrimination. How do these students access education?
Launched December 22, 2014 Katie Mathieson
Patagonia, a region shared by Argentina and Chile, is well known for its unparalled panoramic views, unblemished status and remoteness. What will be the impact of a mega-project for dam construction?
Launched December 15, 2014 Erika Check Hayden
The current Ebola outbreak has been seen through the lens of terror and failure, but the untold stories of the epidemic hold heroism and hope.
Launched December 13, 2014 Amy Maxmen
Research during a disaster can seem frivolous when there aren’t enough resources to handle the immediate response. But in the Ebola outbreak it's become clear that data collection must happen now.
Rafat and Naif on the overlook in the Black Forest near Zell am Hammersbach, Germany. Image by Holly Pickett. Germany, 2014.
Launched December 5, 2014 Joanna Kakissis, Holly Pickett
Thousands of displaced Syrians have made treacherous journeys across land and sea to the safe haven of Europe. But many here don’t want them. How are the new immigrants adapting and adjusting?
Launched December 4, 2014 Jacob Kushner
Unstable land is what caused the January 2010 earthquake that killed some 300,000 people and displaced 1.5 million more in Haiti. Five years on, land conflict is what's stalling Haiti's progress.
Launched November 28, 2014 Carl Gierstorfer
A scientific detective story that crisscrosses the globe, tracing the origins of HIV and its lessons for today.
Launched November 21, 2014 Peter Gwin
The Central African Republic is one of the last truly wild places on earth, a sparsely populated country that until recently remained quietly anonymous. So why did it descend into chaos?
Launched November 17, 2014 Gabe Silverman, Nick Miroff
Colombia’s fast growing palm oil industry has been a boon to its economy. But behind it is a fight for land as farmers backed by paramilitaries push into indigenous and Afro-Colombian communities.
Launched November 17, 2014 Nora FitzGerald
Russia's government crackdown on the LGBT community is fueling an alarming increase in the AIDS epidemic in Russia. New infections increased by 10 percent in 2013.
Screenshot from the short film by Ari Daniel: The Young Future of Lebanon. Lebanon, 2014.
Launched November 11, 2014 Ari Daniel
Beirut is fissured from political and sectarian strain. Many of the kids living there are on the edges of those cracks. This project tells the stories of those kids as radio and video portraits.
Launched November 10, 2014 Jamie Walsh
Half the population of the United Kingdom may be obese by 2050. What are the causes and what is being done?
Launched November 5, 2014 Mathilde Dratwa
When people think of a tax haven, most have visions of a tropical island in the Caribbean. But what if there was a tax haven hidden right among us?
Launched November 3, 2014 Yana Paskova
A look at the intended—and unintended effects—of democracy on Bulgaria, a nation still undergoing social and economic upheaval, 25 years after the fall of the Berlin Wall.
Launched October 23, 2014 Gary Marcuse, Shi Lihong
The Chinese government and people, confronted with colossal environmental challenges, are turning to cultural traditions that under Communism had long been suppressed.
Launched October 14, 2014 Sara Shahriari, Noah Friedman-Rudovsky
More than half of Bolivian women have experienced physical or sexual violence at the hands of an intimate partner, and the criminal justice system is often unresponsive to their plight.
Launched October 6, 2014 Eve Fairbanks
Uruguayan President José Mujica, who lives in penury and drives a battered VW Beetle to better understand his country's poor, may be the most beloved president in the world. Does he deserve the hype?
Launched October 3, 2014 Rosalie Murphy
Facing a growing city and shrinking population, Mumbai's Parsis are urgently seeking ways to care for their elderly, preserve their cultural heritage, and ensure the survival of their religion.
Launched October 3, 2014 Dimiter Kenarov
The Black Sea region has become the focus of heated geopolitical contention, but local environmental issues remain underreported and poorly understood.
Launched October 2, 2014 Sonia Shah, Dan McCarey
The cholera epidemic that hit Haiti four years ago bears some startling resemblances to one that devastated Manhattan two centuries earlier.

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