Launched November 28, 2014 Carl Gierstorfer
A scientific detective story that crisscrosses the globe, tracing the origins of HIV and its lessons for today.
Launched November 21, 2014 Peter Gwin
The Central African Republic is one of the last truly wild places on earth, a sparsely populated country that until recently remained quietly anonymous. So why did it descend into chaos?
Launched November 17, 2014 Nora FitzGerald
Russia's government crackdown on the LGBT community is fueling an alarming increase in the AIDS epidemic in Russia. New infections increased by 10 percent in 2013.
Screenshot from the short film by Ari Daniel: The Young Future of Lebanon. Lebanon, 2014.
Launched November 11, 2014 Ari Daniel
Beirut is fissured from political and sectarian strain. Many of the kids living there are on the edges of those cracks. This project tells the stories of those kids as radio and video portraits.
Launched November 10, 2014 Jamie Walsh
Half the population of the United Kingdom may be obese by 2050. What are the causes and what is being done?
Launched November 5, 2014 Mathilde Dratwa
When people think of a tax haven, most have visions of a tropical island in the Caribbean. But what if there was a tax haven hidden right among us?
Launched November 3, 2014 Yana Paskova
A look at the intended—and unintended effects—of democracy on Bulgaria, a nation still undergoing social and economic upheaval, 25 years after the fall of the Berlin Wall.
Launched October 23, 2014 Gary Marcuse, Shi Lihong
The Chinese government and people, confronted with colossal environmental challenges, are turning to cultural traditions that under Communism had long been suppressed.
Launched October 14, 2014 Sara Shahriari, Noah Friedman-Rudovsky
More than half of Bolivian women have experienced physical or sexual violence at the hands of an intimate partner, and the criminal justice system is often unresponsive to their plight.
Launched October 6, 2014 Eve Fairbanks
Uruguayan President José Mujica, who lives in penury and drives a battered VW Beetle to better understand his country's poor, may be the most beloved president in the world. Does he deserve the hype?
Launched October 3, 2014 Dimiter Kenarov
The Black Sea region has become the focus of heated geopolitical contention, but local environmental issues remain underreported and poorly understood.
Launched October 2, 2014 Sonia Shah, Dan McCarey
The cholera epidemic that hit Haiti four years ago bears some startling resemblances to one that devastated Manhattan two centuries earlier.
Image provided by Amy Maxmen.
Launched September 25, 2014 Amy Maxmen
While paleontologists push the dates of our origins back in time, agricultural scientists are trying to ensure that humans last long into the future.
Image by Paul Nevin. Kenya, 2014.
Launched September 25, 2014 Paul Nevin, Adiba Khan
Kenya continues to lose 7,000 mothers to preventable deaths each year. If the solutions are known, why has there been so little progress in saving their lives?
Launched September 17, 2014 Misha Friedman, Dimiter Kenarov
Russia's military annexation of the Crimean Peninsula from Ukraine has already upended many lives. LGBT people and drug users are among those most at risk.
Launched September 16, 2014 Austin Merrill, Peter DiCampo
The Pulitzer Center is proud to partner with the Everyday Africa initiative and its founders, and with students and educators across the globe, to expand the project's reach and educational potential.
Image by Julia Rendleman. Bhutan, 2014.
Launched September 16, 2014 Julia Rendleman, Moriah Balingit
Bhutanese refugees in Nepal never got much international attention and now, after more than 20 years living in camps, they are being resettled around the world. Will their cultural identity survive?
Launched September 12, 2014 Robert Eric Shoemaker
Robert Eric Shoemaker presents a multimedia excavation of the artisans of Venice through the lens of climate change: a conversation between art and science.
Launched September 11, 2014 Selin Thomas
Boston University student fellow Selin Thomas documents people on the margins as she tells stories of the Syrian conflict.
Launched September 5, 2014 Lynn Hicks, Rodney White
China faces huge challenges in feeding its people sustainably and safely. Iowa and U.S. agribusinesses believe they have the solutions. Are they the right ones?
Launched September 3, 2014 Tom Clement
In the Indian border state of Sikkim, indigenous Himalayan communities charted for hydroelectric dam construction fight to protect their sacred rivers.
Image by Sascha Garrey. Uganda, 2014.
Launched September 2, 2014 Sascha Garrey
In the U.S., the HPV vaccine and regular pap smears have almost stopped the pervasiveness of cervical cancer in its tracks. In Uganda, however, cervical cancer is the most fatal cancer for women.
Launched September 2, 2014 Jessica Edmond
Jessica Edmond, Pulitzer Center student fellow from Southern Illinois University Carbondale, examines the effects of media that promote skin bleaching among women and children in Ghana.
Launched August 28, 2014 Michelle Ferng
Peru, along with the rest of Latin America, is experiencing one of the fastest demographic shifts in the world. Older people over 60 will outnumber children under 14 by 2040. Is the country ready?

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