Issue

Population & Migration

Population and migration issues are fraught with moral positions, confusion, and unexpected connections.

We cannot talk about population growth without also discussing decline; or contraception, without faith and medical technology. It is the mother of cross-cutting issues—at the intersection of economics, environment, gender roles, culture, politics, and religion. The population question is about the possibility and necessity of balancing the needs of nature and human civilization—and whether we can hope to or should have any say over the process.

The issue is global. Overpopulation of one region will seek release in an under-populated region. Stronger economies will be a magnet for those from weaker economies. Local carbon emissions will increase temperatures and change global weather patterns, disrupting food supplies and sowing insecurity. Diseases that begin in crowded slums can travel the world. Aging populations could lead to long-term economic depression, decreasing our ability to address the great problems we face such as environmental degradation.

Changing demographics in countries where men far outnumber the women often leads to human trafficking. Basic human rights are abused in countries where entire communities live without citizenship rights—unable to vote, own property, travel, work legally, or attend school.
Pulitzer Center grantees look at the effects of migration on climate and business, the efforts of immigrants to preserve their cultural identity, and the sacrifices they make in leaving family behind. Our journalists ask tough questions: How do refugees mobilize to take care of themselves when aid agencies fail?

Population & Migration exposes the risks and dangers refugees and migrants face as they leave one nation to seek a better home and a fresh start—only to find more obstacles and new threats. Resettlement presents its own set of challenges; hopes and promises prove illusory.

Population & Migration

Mountain of Tongues

Can a nationalist movement from the internet save the world's most scattered people?

Tomas van Houtryve's Pulitzer Center Catchlight Fellowship

The Pulitzer Center Catchlight Media fellow, Tomas van Houtryve, reports on the U.S.-Mexico border and the “weaponization” of photography using historical photographic techniques alongside cutting-edge surveillance technology.

Trauma Among Syrian Refugees

While Syrians find refuge and aid in Jordan, little has been done to address the mental trauma they have faced—until now.

Inter(Nation)al

Inter(Nation)al ​explores current events through the lens of treaties signed between the U.S. Government and Native Nations. These treaties bind all of us—legally and culturally.

Meet the Journalist: Xyza Bacani

Xyza Bacani discusses her story on migrant workers who run away from their employers in Singapore and the power imbalance between agencies, employers and migrants that encourages exploitation.

Meet the Journalist: Jake Naughton

Photographer Jake Naughton discusses his reporting on Uganda’s LGBT community following the notorious "Kill the Gays" bill. Though the bill was struck down, it created a cascade of effects.

This Week: Poverty in America

This Week: Nearly one in five children in America suffers from being poor, deportations are straining relations between Australia and New Zealand, and ISIS has undermined faith in Iraq.