Issue

Population & Migration

Population and migration issues are fraught with moral positions, confusion, and unexpected connections.

We cannot talk about population growth without also discussing decline; or contraception, without faith and medical technology. It is the mother of cross-cutting issues—at the intersection of economics, environment, gender roles, culture, politics, and religion. The population question is about the possibility and necessity of balancing the needs of nature and human civilization—and whether we can hope to or should have any say over the process.

The issue is global. Overpopulation of one region will seek release in an under-populated region. Stronger economies will be a magnet for those from weaker economies. Local carbon emissions will increase temperatures and change global weather patterns, disrupting food supplies and sowing insecurity. Diseases that begin in crowded slums can travel the world. Aging populations could lead to long-term economic depression, decreasing our ability to address the great problems we face such as environmental degradation.

Changing demographics in countries where men far outnumber the women often leads to human trafficking. Basic human rights are abused in countries where entire communities live without citizenship rights—unable to vote, own property, travel, work legally, or attend school.
Pulitzer Center grantees look at the effects of migration on climate and business, the efforts of immigrants to preserve their cultural identity, and the sacrifices they make in leaving family behind. Our journalists ask tough questions: How do refugees mobilize to take care of themselves when aid agencies fail?

Population & Migration exposes the risks and dangers refugees and migrants face as they leave one nation to seek a better home and a fresh start—only to find more obstacles and new threats. Resettlement presents its own set of challenges; hopes and promises prove illusory.

Population & Migration

December 23, 2016

Refugee Boom and Bust: A Global Gold Rush

Malia Politzer, Emily Kassie

From smugglers in Agadez, to factory owners in Turkey, to the Italian and Nigerian mafias in Italy, and small business owners in Greece, people making a killing off the global migrant crisis.

December 20, 2016

The Missing Migrants: Families Search for Answers

Aaron Nelsen, Julysa Sosa

For years Central Americans have transited Mexico en route to the United States, many are never heard from again. In a country teeming with the disappeared, Central American mothers search for theirs.

December 19, 2016

Finding Home

Lynsey Addario, Aryn Baker, Francesca Trianni

Following the lives of four Syrian refugee mothers and their babies from the day these women gave birth through their newborns’ all-important milestones: first smiles, first meals, first steps.

December 12, 2016

The Gulf Art War

Negar Azimi, Knut Egil Wang

The world’s leading architects, the most vulnerable laborers, and a movement of concerned artists converge on a man-made island in the Persian Gulf called Saadiyat, which means “happiness” in Arabic.

December 09, 2016

Philippines: The Execution Beat

Jason Motlagh

Thousands of people have been executed on the streets of the Philippines since President Rodrigo Duterte launched his all-out war on drugs. But shooting his way out of the problem is taking a heavy toll.

November 23, 2016

Mexico Considers Trump

Nick Schifrin, Zach Fannin

Donald Trump has targeted Mexico more than any other country, promising to build a wall, deport millions of Mexicans from the U.S., and cancel NAFTA. PBS NewsHour examines how Mexico is responding.

The Great Divide

Traveling by train through India's disputed region of Kashmir.

Everyday Struggle in Malaysia

Refugees in Malaysia are not allowed to work and do not have access to health facilities or public school education. So what does their everyday lives look like?