Issue

Population & Migration

Population and migration issues are fraught with moral positions, confusion, and unexpected connections.

We cannot talk about population growth without also discussing decline; or contraception, without faith and medical technology. It is the mother of cross-cutting issues—at the intersection of economics, environment, gender roles, culture, politics, and religion. The population question is about the possibility and necessity of balancing the needs of nature and human civilization—and whether we can hope to or should have any say over the process.

The issue is global. Overpopulation of one region will seek release in an under-populated region. Stronger economies will be a magnet for those from weaker economies. Local carbon emissions will increase temperatures and change global weather patterns, disrupting food supplies and sowing insecurity. Diseases that begin in crowded slums can travel the world. Aging populations could lead to long-term economic depression, decreasing our ability to address the great problems we face such as environmental degradation.

Changing demographics in countries where men far outnumber the women often leads to human trafficking. Basic human rights are abused in countries where entire communities live without citizenship rights—unable to vote, own property, travel, work legally, or attend school.
Pulitzer Center grantees look at the effects of migration on climate and business, the efforts of immigrants to preserve their cultural identity, and the sacrifices they make in leaving family behind. Our journalists ask tough questions: How do refugees mobilize to take care of themselves when aid agencies fail?

Population & Migration exposes the risks and dangers refugees and migrants face as they leave one nation to seek a better home and a fresh start—only to find more obstacles and new threats. Resettlement presents its own set of challenges; hopes and promises prove illusory.

Population & Migration

May 22, 2014

Who Takes Care of Nanny's Children?

Ana P. Santos

When a Filipino woman leaves her home to work overseas as a nanny, she knows that it will be years before she sees her own children again.

March 31, 2014

India's Hospital Crisis

Michael Edison Hayden, Sami Siva

Doctors have demanded fixes to India's public hospitals for years, but have been stifled by mismanagement.

January 11, 2014

Official Homophobia in Russia

Misha Friedman

With homophobic rhetoric now legitimized by federal law, being gay in Russia can be extremely dangerous.

January 10, 2014

Bishan: Reinventing China’s Emptying Countryside

Yunfan Sun, Leah Thompson

As China rapidly urbanizes, many villages—and their distinct cultural heritage and folk traditions—disappear daily. Two urban Chinese artists go back to the land in search of meaning in modern China.

Outsourcing the Dirty Work

Europe is partnering with Libyan militias to prevent African migrants from ever reaching Europe. The result is a detention-industrial complex that turns African migrants into commodities.

Left Behind in Rural China

A report for PBS NewsHour shows the challenges faced by three siblings among an estimated 9 million children left in the Chinese countryside by parents working in wealthier cities

How the Cuban Migration Story Is Changing

A Cuban family treks through a jungle for seven days on foot. Another Cuban man gets stuck in Central America seeking freedom. Listen to their stories on 1A.