Issue

Population & Migration

Population and migration issues are fraught with moral positions, confusion, and unexpected connections.

We cannot talk about population growth without also discussing decline; or contraception, without faith and medical technology. It is the mother of cross-cutting issues—at the intersection of economics, environment, gender roles, culture, politics, and religion. The population question is about the possibility and necessity of balancing the needs of nature and human civilization—and whether we can hope to or should have any say over the process.

The issue is global. Overpopulation of one region will seek release in an under-populated region. Stronger economies will be a magnet for those from weaker economies. Local carbon emissions will increase temperatures and change global weather patterns, disrupting food supplies and sowing insecurity. Diseases that begin in crowded slums can travel the world. Aging populations could lead to long-term economic depression, decreasing our ability to address the great problems we face such as environmental degradation.

Changing demographics in countries where men far outnumber the women often leads to human trafficking. Basic human rights are abused in countries where entire communities live without citizenship rights—unable to vote, own property, travel, work legally, or attend school.
Pulitzer Center grantees look at the effects of migration on climate and business, the efforts of immigrants to preserve their cultural identity, and the sacrifices they make in leaving family behind. Our journalists ask tough questions: How do refugees mobilize to take care of themselves when aid agencies fail?

Population & Migration exposes the risks and dangers refugees and migrants face as they leave one nation to seek a better home and a fresh start—only to find more obstacles and new threats. Resettlement presents its own set of challenges; hopes and promises prove illusory.

Population & Migration

June 04, 2015

From Paradise to Peril: The Amazon's Isolated Tribes

Heather Pringle, Andrew Lawler

Some of the world’s last isolated tribes are poised to make contact with the outside world as illegal loggers, miners, cocaine traffickers and others penetrate their territory.

February 25, 2015

Polio's Last Stand

Tim McGirk, Jason Motlagh

After dozens of vaccination workers were killed in Afghanistan, polio once again began to spread into the borderlands. The same strain is now re-surfacing in Syria.

February 22, 2015

Kiribati: Casualties of Climate Change

Kenneth R. Weiss

As the low-lying island nation of Kiribati edges closer to a climate change end game, what will happen to its people, its territory, its sovereignty?

January 27, 2015

The Megacity Initiative

John Fitzgerald, Matthew Niederhauser

The Megacity Initiative is a new media venture investigating the sustainable development of burgeoning urban centers around the world in order to more prudently integrate future city dwellers.

January 25, 2015

Beijing's 'Rat Tribe'

Sim Chi Yin, Ian Johnson

Living beneath Beijing's skyscrapers and residential blocks are an estimated 1 million migrant workers. Dubbed the "Rat Tribe", these low-wage workers make a home in windowless basement cubicles.

Returning to Sosua

Emily Codik was surprised by the island's transformation from a safe haven for Holocaust refugees to a sex-tourism hotspot.

The Long Road from Cuba

Between 2014 and 2016, more than 100,000 Cubans entered the United States on foot. This is the story of three Cubans who made a clandestine voyage from Quito, Ecuador, to El Paso, Texas.

Hide and Seek in Panama

Cuban migrants' reluctance to speak with reporters demonstrates the gravity of their situation as they make their way to the U.S.

Promised Land

Is Angela Merkel's Germany really the paradise refugees believe it to be?

Meet Fred de Sam Lazaro

Fred de Sam Lazaro explains the source of declining birth rate in Brazil and how it could enhance women’s role in the society—a topic of his project “Brazil: Girl Power.”

Lesson Plan: Revolution in Tunisia

In this lesson students will understand the conditions in Tunisia that led to Jasmine Revolution in December 2010, and the examine the consequences, both intended and unintended, of the rebellion.

Pulitzer Center Gender Lens Conference Highlights

Two-day conference illuminates why diversity of perspective, across gender, race, ethnicity, religion, matters so much in storytelling.