Issue

Population & Migration

Population and migration issues are fraught with moral positions, confusion, and unexpected connections.

We cannot talk about population growth without also discussing decline; or contraception, without faith and medical technology. It is the mother of cross-cutting issues—at the intersection of economics, environment, gender roles, culture, politics, and religion. The population question is about the possibility and necessity of balancing the needs of nature and human civilization—and whether we can hope to or should have any say over the process.

The issue is global. Overpopulation of one region will seek release in an under-populated region. Stronger economies will be a magnet for those from weaker economies. Local carbon emissions will increase temperatures and change global weather patterns, disrupting food supplies and sowing insecurity. Diseases that begin in crowded slums can travel the world. Aging populations could lead to long-term economic depression, decreasing our ability to address the great problems we face such as environmental degradation.

Changing demographics in countries where men far outnumber the women often leads to human trafficking. Basic human rights are abused in countries where entire communities live without citizenship rights—unable to vote, own property, travel, work legally, or attend school.
Pulitzer Center grantees look at the effects of migration on climate and business, the efforts of immigrants to preserve their cultural identity, and the sacrifices they make in leaving family behind. Our journalists ask tough questions: How do refugees mobilize to take care of themselves when aid agencies fail?

Population & Migration exposes the risks and dangers refugees and migrants face as they leave one nation to seek a better home and a fresh start—only to find more obstacles and new threats. Resettlement presents its own set of challenges; hopes and promises prove illusory.

Population & Migration

March 20, 2016

Children's Homes in El Salvador

Kayli Plotner

More than 20 years after the end of its civil war, El Salvador remains plagued by violence and poverty. Kayli Plotner reports on what has happened to the country's children.

January 22, 2016

In Limbo: Kenya’s Exodus to Europe

Wairimu Michengi

As more Africans risk their lives trying to leave their homelands, people in one area of rural Kenya rely on a woman who has built a career on safely transporting them to Europe.

December 23, 2015

Kenya Abandons the Northeast to Al Shabab

Ariel Zirulnick, Will Swanson

Al Shabab targeted non-Somali Kenyans in the northeast, sending them fleeing to safer parts of Kenya. Now the region must stand on its own.

December 11, 2015

What Happened on Tarajal Beach?

Marc Herman, Andreea Campeanu

On February 7, 2014, 300 people rushed a fence dividing Morocco from Spain, a rare land border between Europe and Africa. At least 14 died and border police now face charges of murder. Was it?

November 27, 2015

In Lima Who Owns the Land?

Betsy Saavedra

Where would you go if you were homeless, and there was no government assistance? In Lima, Peru many are seeking legal titles to homes where their families have lived for decades.

Keeping Refugees in Africa

Since last summer, the flow of refugees from Libya to Europe has shrunk considerably. The EU attributes this to its own successful policy, but reality is a lot more depressing.

Finding Therapy in Jordan

With only 60 to 100 psychiatrists in Jordan, there's little help for Syrian refugees. Local organizations and refugees are leading the work to ensure that refugees get the therapy that they need.

Bosnia Prepares for First Post-War Census

A national census in Bosnia in October 2013 may reveal an increasingly ethnic Bosnian population, but getting minorities to officially declare their often-stigmatized identities will be difficult.

Meet Paul Salopek

Journalist Paul Salopek is preparing to leave on a journey that will take seven years and span 39 countries—and he is doing it all on foot.

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