Issue

Population & Migration

Population and migration issues are fraught with moral positions, confusion, and unexpected connections.

We cannot talk about population growth without also discussing decline; or contraception, without faith and medical technology. It is the mother of cross-cutting issues—at the intersection of economics, environment, gender roles, culture, politics, and religion. The population question is about the possibility and necessity of balancing the needs of nature and human civilization—and whether we can hope to or should have any say over the process.

The issue is global. Overpopulation of one region will seek release in an under-populated region. Stronger economies will be a magnet for those from weaker economies. Local carbon emissions will increase temperatures and change global weather patterns, disrupting food supplies and sowing insecurity. Diseases that begin in crowded slums can travel the world. Aging populations could lead to long-term economic depression, decreasing our ability to address the great problems we face such as environmental degradation.

Changing demographics in countries where men far outnumber the women often leads to human trafficking. Basic human rights are abused in countries where entire communities live without citizenship rights—unable to vote, own property, travel, work legally, or attend school.
Pulitzer Center grantees look at the effects of migration on climate and business, the efforts of immigrants to preserve their cultural identity, and the sacrifices they make in leaving family behind. Our journalists ask tough questions: How do refugees mobilize to take care of themselves when aid agencies fail?

Population & Migration exposes the risks and dangers refugees and migrants face as they leave one nation to seek a better home and a fresh start—only to find more obstacles and new threats. Resettlement presents its own set of challenges; hopes and promises prove illusory.

Population & Migration

September 25, 2014

Ethiopia: Humankind's Origin and Survival

Amy Maxmen

While paleontologists push the dates of our origins back in time, agricultural scientists are trying to ensure that humans last long into the future.

September 16, 2014

The Last Refugees: Bhutanese in Nepal

Julia Rendleman, Moriah Balingit

Bhutanese refugees in Nepal never got much international attention and now, after more than 20 years living in camps, they are being resettled around the world. Will their cultural identity survive?

September 11, 2014

Syrian Refugees in Turkey

Selin Thomas

Boston University student fellow Selin Thomas documents people on the margins as she tells stories of the Syrian conflict.

September 05, 2014

Feeding China

Lynn Hicks, Rodney White

China faces huge challenges in feeding its people sustainably and safely. Iowa and U.S. agribusinesses believe they have the solutions. Are they the right ones?

August 28, 2014

Peru: An Aging Revolution

Michelle Ferng

Peru, along with the rest of Latin America, is experiencing one of the fastest demographic shifts in the world. Older people over 60 will outnumber children under 14 by 2040. Is the country ready?

August 27, 2014

Istanbul: Housing for the Displaced

Paul Short

Few world cities match the speed of Istanbul’s urban transformation. As new mass housing projects, business districts and suspended bridges dot the city’s horizon, the urban poor are being displaced.

Ramadan in Refuge

Breaking fast and hearing stories from resettled refugees in Berlin, one iftar at a time.

Turkish-German Iftar

Breaking fast with the biggest Islamic organization in Germany, one with controversial ties to the Turkish government, and a Syrian take on religion, compulsion, and "helping refugees."

The Refugee Converts

Visiting a German church filled with Iranian and Afghan asylum seekers, all supposed converts to Christianity.

Meet Jon Sawyer

Jon Sawyer is founding director of the Pulitzer Center. His assignments have taken him to some five dozen countries, with special projects ranging from southern Africa, Cuba and Haiti to Eastern Europe, the former Soviet Union and China.

This Week: Abu Dhabi's Facade

This week: what it really cost to build Abu Dhabi, summary executions in the Philippines, and the Syrian singer who lives on.

This Week: Bringing Home Hope from Cuba

This week: lung cancer patients travel to Cuba for a promising vaccine, South Africa is challenges the stigma attached to HIV/AIDS, climate change in Greenland is causing drought for farmers.