Issue

Population & Migration

Population and migration issues are fraught with moral positions, confusion, and unexpected connections.

We cannot talk about population growth without also discussing decline; or contraception, without faith and medical technology. It is the mother of cross-cutting issues—at the intersection of economics, environment, gender roles, culture, politics, and religion. The population question is about the possibility and necessity of balancing the needs of nature and human civilization—and whether we can hope to or should have any say over the process.

The issue is global. Overpopulation of one region will seek release in an under-populated region. Stronger economies will be a magnet for those from weaker economies. Local carbon emissions will increase temperatures and change global weather patterns, disrupting food supplies and sowing insecurity. Diseases that begin in crowded slums can travel the world. Aging populations could lead to long-term economic depression, decreasing our ability to address the great problems we face such as environmental degradation.

Changing demographics in countries where men far outnumber the women often leads to human trafficking. Basic human rights are abused in countries where entire communities live without citizenship rights—unable to vote, own property, travel, work legally, or attend school.
Pulitzer Center grantees look at the effects of migration on climate and business, the efforts of immigrants to preserve their cultural identity, and the sacrifices they make in leaving family behind. Our journalists ask tough questions: How do refugees mobilize to take care of themselves when aid agencies fail?

Population & Migration exposes the risks and dangers refugees and migrants face as they leave one nation to seek a better home and a fresh start—only to find more obstacles and new threats. Resettlement presents its own set of challenges; hopes and promises prove illusory.

Population & Migration

Libya: What's Next?

The Pulitzer Center and the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace hosted an event on the migrant crisis and geopolitical issues in Libya moderated by Indira Lakshmanan and featuring with Ambassador Wafa Bughaighis of Libya, Pulitzer Center-supported journalists, and regional experts.

Winny Contreras: The Long Commute

A man from Guanajuato, Mexico who crossed the border to work on a farm in Connecticut contends with being away from his family for years to help support their dreams and build a new life for them.

Venezuela: A Ticking Time-bomb

As Venezuela’s social and economic crisis deepens, thousands of citizens are taking to the streets. Meanwhile, a quieter humanitarian one is unfolding as hunger and malnutrition spread.

India: Migrating Into Slavery

Each winter hundreds of thousands of Indians migrate north to man the world's second largest brick industry. They're promised opportunity, but many are bonded into debt.

A Postcard Home

"A Postcard Home" is a collaborative series exploring a remarkable chapter in human migration through the viewpoint of a child.

Finding Home in an Era of Displacement

What is home for war refugees and the communities trying to integrate them? Where do conflicts arise and how do diverse people find common ground? A series about war refugees starting over in Europe.

People of the Parting Rocks

Gaining understanding of the suicide crisis facing the Cree community of Attawapiskat, Ontario through an understanding of the culture, values and perspectives of its residents.

This Week: Pakistan and India are Becoming Nuclear Rivals

This week: Why Pakistan and India are equipping their submarines with nuclear-tipped missiles, what life is like for ethnic minority Vietnamese living in Cambodia, and how armed groups have filled a power vacuum in the Central African Republic.