Issue

Ocean Health

From the Arctic Ocean to the South Pacific, the impacts of climate change are becoming impossible to ignore. Ice caps are melting, sea levels are rising, the very chemistry of the seas is undergoing change.

Through Ocean Health, readers can explore a range of journalism on critical issues related to the health of our oceans and ways in which scientists and local communities are adapting and fighting for the future of our oceans. From ground-breaking reports on ocean acidification to stories on how the melting Arctic ice cap is affecting our lives, these in-depth projects shed new light on under-reported crises that will have a lasting—and potentially devastating—impact on future generations.

Ocean Health also looks at how overfishing, oil exploration, and exploitation of mineral resources beneath the ocean’s surface can degrade the environment and jeopardize food sources needed to sustain the planet’s ever-expanding population. Through this journalism, the Pulitzer Center hopes to inform the debate on one of the most critical challenges of our time—the health of our oceans.

Ocean Health

Iceland: What Happended to Global Warming?

After an unusually stormy winter and a cold spring the people of Northern Iceland like to make fun of the global warming theory—but they don’t really question the scientific arguments.

In the Sea of Cortez, Fighting for Scraps

Fifty years of intense fishing on Mexico's Sea of Cortez has left behind a highly depleted resource. As environmentalists struggle to find solutions, photographs capture the fishermen's daily quest.

Mexico: The Fishermen and the Sea

For decades, environmentalists painted fishermen as the enemy of the seas. Today, conservation hinges on scientists and locals working together — and seeing fisherman as an intrinsic part of the sea.

Current Events: World Water Day

Peter Sawyer, Pulitzer Center

Image from Steve Sapienza and Glenn Baker's Easy Like Water project on floating schools in Bangladesh

From the women who spend hours daily fetching water to political battles over international rivers to melting icepack and rising sea levels, the water issue affects us all, and we all contribute to it.

Heat of the Moment: Global Gateway in St. Louis

In January 2010, Pulitzer-sponsored journalists Jennifer Redfearn, William Wheeler and Anna-Katarina Gravgaard visited more than fifteen middle and high schools and three universities in the St. Louis area. They spoke about their experiences reporting on the issues surrounding climate change in the Carteret Islands and South Asia, respectively. Their discussions with the students ranged from the environmental, social, and political implications of climate change, to the technical and educational sides of a career in journalism, to news literacy and the changing media landscape.

Introducing "Bangladesh: Easy Like Water"

Glenn Baker and Stephen Sapienza are in Copenhagen to cover the COP15 talk after documenting rising sea levels in Bangladesh. Follow them as they report on the meetings and the Bangladeshi delegation's efforts to draw attention to the real and present outcomes of unchecked climate change.

Climate Change in Bangladesh: Rising sea levels threaten low-lying lands

A key feature of the Pulitzer Center's upcoming web portal on climate change is Daniel Grossman's reporting from Bangladesh on how rising sea levels threaten this South Asian country.

Yesterday Grossman had a piece run on PRI's The World, looking at the ways in which Bangladesh is experimenting with protecting itself. Among the experiments -- using floods to prevent floods.

See the piece as it ran at www.theworld.org