Population & Migration

Allison Herrera and Mary Bishop, both Salinan Indians, look out at the Indian Cemetery at the San Antonio Mission in Lockwood, California. 
The cemetery was laid out in 1804 at the height of the mission building period in California. Missions were built by California Indians through force. The total number of California Indians laid out in this cemetery is unknown, although Mary said it was in the thousands. Image by Isaac Kestenbaum. California, 2017.
December 15, 2017
by Isaac Kestenbaum, Allison Herrera

Inter(Nation)al ​explores current events through the lens of treaties signed between the U.S. Government and Native Nations. These treaties bind all of us—legally and culturally.

An archival photo from the early to mid-1930s of Allison Herrera's family near Toro Creek, an ancestral village of their Salinan Tribe. From left: Felista Rosas, her great-grandmother; Anna Herrera, her grandmother; Andy Rosas, Anna's brother; and Ramon Rosas, Andy and Anna's uncle. Image courtesy Allison Herrera.
December 14, 2017 / NPR
by Allison Herrera

Allison Herrera is Salinan, a member of a California tribe that's not recognized by the federal government and has no land or sovereignty. She explains what's being done to change that.

Javan, 19, a transgender woman, poses for a portrait near her mother's apartment in Kampala. She spent around eight months in Kenya as a refugee there after a mob beat her, stripped her naked and paraded her up and down the street yelling, "He's a homo," behind her near her Kampala home. Last summer, however, she returned to Uganda in order to make a stand. Image by Jake Naughton. Uganda, 2017.
December 12, 2017 / them.
by Jake Naughton

“As an activist in Uganda, you wake up everyday and you say, ‘I have not had an attack.’ That is a blessing.”

In this Wednesday, Nov. 22, 2017, photo, F, 22, who says she was raped by members of Myanmar’s armed forces in June and again in September, cries as she speaks to The Associated Press in her tent in Kutupalong refugee camp in Bangladesh. The Associated Press has found that the rape of Rohingya women by Myanmar’s security forces has been sweeping and methodical. The AP interviewed 29 women and girls who say they were raped by Myanmar’s armed forces, and found distinct patterns in their accounts, their assailants’ uniforms and the details of the rapes themselves. The most common attack involved groups of soldiers storming into a house, beating any children inside and then beating and gang raping the women. Image by Wong Maye-E. Bangladesh, 2017.
December 12, 2017

This week: The Burmese military's use of rape as a weapon of terror, Iran's growing influence in post-Hussein Iraq, and the story of why a hard-drive with secrets about an El Salvadorian colonel was...

Attendees watched films and listened to panel discussion about global health challenges faced by refugees and migrants. Image courtesy Tina McGrath/ProImage Design and the Institute of Public Health at Washington University in Saint Louis. 2017.
December 11, 2017
by Kamran Rahman

The festival screened five Pulitzer-sponsored films, which centered on public health challenges faced by migrants and refufees across the globe.

In this Wednesday, Nov. 22, 2017, photo, F, 22, who says she was raped by members of Myanmar’s armed forces in June and again in September, cries as she speaks to The Associated Press in her tent in Kutupalong refugee camp in Bangladesh. The Associated Press has found that the rape of Rohingya women by Myanmar’s security forces has been sweeping and methodical. The AP interviewed 29 women and girls who say they were raped by Myanmar’s armed forces, and found distinct patterns in their accounts, their assailants’ uniforms and the details of the rapes themselves. The most common attack involved groups of soldiers storming into a house, beating any children inside and then beating and gang raping the women. Image by Wong Maye-E. Bangladesh, 2017.
December 11, 2017 / AP News
by Kristen Gelineau, Maye-e Wong

An AP report documents savage sexual assaults on 29 women and girls, age 13 to 35, bolstering the case that Myanmar’s armed forces are systematically employing rape as a "calculated tool of terror."

In this November 19 photo, a Rohingya Muslim child runs on a mud track between tents at Kutupalong refugee camp in Bangladesh. Image by Maye-e Wong. Bangladesh, 2017. 
December 11, 2017
by Kristen Gelineau, Todd Pitman

"All I have left are my words," the Rohingya Muslim refugee said. The AP documents systematic gang rape of Rohingya women by the Myanmar military, and reconstructs a massacre in one Rohingya village.

December 11, 2017
by Marvin Kalb, Daniella Zalcman

Pulitzer Center grantees and staff discuss intersection of history and journalism.

Three months after Hurricane Irma, Barbuda's lone primary school in the island capital Codrington remains roofless. An estimated 90 percent of properties were damaged in Barbuda when the Caribbean island was hit by Irma on Sept, 6, 2017. Image by Gregory Scruggs. Barbuda, 2017.
December 7, 2017
by Gregory Scruggs

In September, Hurricane Irma leveled the island of Barbuda and all 1,800 residents were evacuated. Now, redevelopment and the end of collective land ownership threaten to keep them off their land.

Cliff Drinkwater, a 73-year-old pensioner, surveys the damage to his childhood home in Barbuda's capital Codrington November 17, 2017. An estimated 90 percent of properties were damaged in Barbuda when the Caribbean island was hit by Hurricane Irma on Sept, 6, 2017. Image by Gregory Scruggs. Barbuda, 2017.
December 6, 2017 / Thomson Reuters Foundation
by Gregory Scruggs

For almost 200 years, Barbudans have collectively governed the use of land on their island and many fear a freehold system would bring unwelcome foreign investment.

Tailor Pierre Kwetey inside his workshop, as a man walks by the house that allegedly contained a fake US Embassy in Accra. Image by Yepoka Yeebo. Ghana, 2017.
December 6, 2017
by Yepoka Yeebo

For over a decade, there existed a fake U.S. Embassy in Accra, Ghana. When the news broke, there were more questions than answers and some officials are convinced it didn't happen.

Image by Yepoka Yeebo. Ghana, 2017.
December 5, 2017

This week: The story of a fake embassy in Ghana turns out to be—you guessed it—fake, how Sarah Al Suhaimi's meteoric rise through the Saudi business world signals a new era for women, and Poland's...