Population & Migration

When the refugees of the Holocaust arrived in Sosua, they would often have the beach to themselves. Now, on weekends, beachgoers fill the area, and locals say people often walk down the shore handing out business cards advertising sex work. Image by Emily Codik. Dominican Republic, 2017.
October 19, 2017
by Emily Codik

A little-known story of survival during the Holocaust.

Children play in a hanger in Tempelhof airport, once a Nazi hanger and now home to over 2000 refugees. Image by Emily Kassie. Germany, 2016.
October 19, 2017
by Malia Politzer, Kamran Rahman

Pulitzer Center grantee Malia Politzer broke down her award-winning multimedia piece on the European migrant crisis.

"Refugees Welcome" written on a wall in Berlin. Germany took in the most refugees during Europe's 2015 influx. Image by Alice Su. Germany, 2017.
October 19, 2017 / News Deeply
by Alice Su

Refugees coming to Germany bring with them vastly different ideas about religion. Now, their relationship with their faith is being shaped once again in their new country.

The local community of Macau enjoys the parade during the Lusofonia Festival. Photo Courtesy of the Instituto Cultural de Macau.
October 18, 2017 / Pulitzer Center
by Bruno Beidacki

Organizations such as the Instituto Cultural de Macau work on a daily basis to revive the Portuguese culture in Macau—investing money and time. But are their efforts enough?

The main beach in Sosua, Dominican Republic. Women, facing few job prospects, travel to Sosua from across the island to find work in the sex industry. Locals say it’s common to see sex workers walking on the beach, looking for clients. Image by Emily Codik. Dominican Republic, 2017.
October 18, 2017 / Field Notes
by Emily Codik

Emily Codik was surprised by the island's transformation from a safe haven for Holocaust refugees to a sex-tourism hotspot.

When the refugees of the Holocaust arrived in Sosua, they would often have the beach to themselves. Now, on weekends, beachgoers fill the area, and locals say people often walk down the shore handing out business cards advertising sex work. Image by Emily Codik. Dominican Republic, 2017.
October 18, 2017
by Emily Codik

Sosua, a northern beach town in the Dominican Republic, was founded by Holocaust refugees. How did it become one of the Caribbean's biggest sex-tourism destinations?

During the height of the migration crisis, Cubans set up makeshift tents in Panama as they made their journey to the United States. Image courtesy of 14ymedio. Panama, 2017.
October 17, 2017 / Radio Ambulante
by Luis Trelles

Between 2014 and 2016, more than 100,000 Cubans entered the United States on foot. This is the story of three Cubans who made a clandestine voyage from Quito, Ecuador, to El Paso, Texas.

Lined with restaurants and shops, the beach in Sosua, Dominican Republic, is frequented by locals and foreigners. Image by Emily Codik. Dominican Republic, 2017.
October 17, 2017 / The Washington Post
by Emily Codik

A personal account of how a journalist's family escaped the Holocaust and found safety in the Dominican Republic, where they joined a settlement of Jewish refugees.

Pulitzer Center grantee Malia Politzer.
October 11, 2017
by Malia Politzer, Rebecca Kaplan

Pulitzer Center-supported journalist presents her award-winning reporting on the "21st century gold rush," which shows how the biggest refugee crisis has been profitable for criminals. 

Migrants whose boat was intercepted by the Libyan navy wait to be given shoes before they can be moved to a detention center in Tripoli. Image by Peter Tinti. Libya, 2017.
October 11, 2017
by Peter Tinti

Latest Foreign Policy Pulitzer Center-supported reporting part of author's New York City book event. 

Abdullah, 12, lives in a crowded converted gym outside Berlin that houses refugees. Image by Emily Kassie. Germany, 2016.
October 11, 2017
by Malia Politzer

Pulitzer Center grantee speaks with students and faculty about her award-winning reporting and issues of how some small business owners are profiting from the global migrant crisis.

DC Study Abroad Contest finalists stand with their photographs at a reception on September 26, 2017. All contest finalists received framed prints of their winning photographs and captions. Image by Fareed Mostoufi. United States, 2017.
October 10, 2017
by Peter DiCampo, Brieanna Iyomahan

The finalists of the DCPS Study Abroad Photo Contest attended a reception at the Pulitzer Center, which featured a presentation from Peter DiCampo.