Population & Migration

A Swedish flag aloft in Stockholm. Image by Amy Russo. Sweden, 2017.
July 3, 2017 by Amy Russo

Thousands of lone minors fled war to find shelter in Sweden, a once exceptionally welcoming country. Now, asylum regulations are tightening, leaving refugees uncertain of the future.

At Parque Fe del Valle, one of Havana’s busiest open-air cybercafes. Image by Alexa Hoyer. Cuba.
June 19, 2017 by Kim Wall

About two decades too late, the Internet is cautiously breaking Cuba's spell of isolation. What impacts on culture and identity does the island's defiant re-connection to the outside world bring?

Paris. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.
April 21, 2017 by Sarah Wildman

The French elections are the next major test for gauging the global impact of populism, nativism and Islamophobia.

Women working at a small, temporary brick factory in Malda village. While most of the laborers at this factory were local relatives of the owner, the industry is notorious for exploiting migrant labor. Image by Yardain Amron. India, 2016.
April 14, 2017 by Yardain Amron

Each winter hundreds of thousands of Indians migrate north to man the world's second largest brick industry. They're promised opportunity, but many are bonded into debt.

April 12, 2017 by Diana Markosian

"A Postcard Home" is a collaborative series exploring a remarkable chapter in human migration through the viewpoint of a child.

The northern lights fill the sky over the remote First Nations community of Attawapiskat. Attawapiskat is an isolated First Nation community located in northern Ontario, Canada, at the mouth of the Attawapiskat River on James Bay. On April 9, 2016, the community of approximately 2000 people declared a state of emergency after being overwhelmed with attempted suicides, over 100 attempts in a ten month period. Image by David Maurice Smith/Oculi. Canada, 2016.
April 6, 2017 by David Maurice Smith

Gaining understanding of the suicide crisis facing the Cree community of Attawapiskat, Ontario through an understanding of the culture, values and perspectives of its residents.

Blessing and two other teen-age Nigerian girls watch a rainbow over the short stretch of water separating Sicily from mainland Italy. Eighty percent of young Nigerian women who cross the Mediterranean are trafficked into sexual exploitation. Image by Ben Taub. Italy, 2017.
April 3, 2017 by Ben Taub

Most African migrants heading to Europe unwittingly follow the ancient caravan routes of the trans-Saharan slave trade. Along the way, many are trafficked, sold, and brutally exploited.

Museo Soumaya, designed by Fernando Romero for his client (and father-in-law) Carlos Slim, in the Nuevo Polanco district of Mexico City. Image by Lars Plougmann. Mexico, 2015.
March 2, 2017 by Daniel Brook

This global reporting project on urbanization in the developing world examines how three major countries—China, India, and Mexico—are dealing with a similar challenge in their own unique ways.

Seascape view from aboard the German frigate ship, the Frankfurt am Main, in the Mediterranean Ocean off of Tripoli. Image by Michael Scott Moore. Libya, 2016.
February 22, 2017 by Michael Scott Moore

Smugglers along the trail from East Africa to Europe, through Libya, tend to look after their own. Are former Somali pirates running Somali migrants?

Close to 40 men and women sit around a table and share a meal inside the kitchen of the shelter.
January 13, 2017 by Xyza Bacani

Singapore is a prosperous country in Asia and migrant workers have played an important role in its success, but at what cost?

Teacher Ou Shuiming's class photographed in 1983.
January 4, 2017 by Rong Xiaoqing

Why are people who were smuggled to the U.S. from a rural high school in China three decades ago now going back to China?

Image by Emily Kassie. Turkey, 2016.
December 23, 2016 by Malia Politzer, Emily Kassie

From smugglers in Agadez, to factory owners in Turkey, to the Italian and Nigerian mafias in Italy, and small business owners in Greece, people making a killing off the global migrant crisis.