June 12, 2014 / GlobalPost by Caryle Murphy

Saudi Arabia finds itself in the midst of major social change as the relationship between the House of Saud and its official religious establishment shift.

June 9, 2014 / GlobalPost by Caryle Murphy

After decades of declining popularity under the ascendance of political Islam, Arabism is seeing a revival of sorts among Saudi youth as a way out of the sectarian conflicts now gripping the region.

June 6, 2014 / The Guardian | Global Development by Kenneth R. Weiss

Contraception delivered through female community health workers has helped reduce birthrates and infant mortality.

June 6, 2014 / GlobalPost by Caryle Murphy

The kingdom's official version of Islam, Wahhabism, has dampened Saudi creativity and impeded government modernization programs. But reform is in the air.

June 5, 2014 / Rappler by Ana P. Santos

"When it comes to being a nanny or caregiver, the Filipina is the best in her class. She’s the top of the line. It is an honorable profession." – Grace Princesa, Philippine Ambassador to the UAE.

June 2, 2014 / Al Jazeera America by David Rochkind, Jens Erik Gould

Tuberculosis is a 'neglected disease' in Vietnam despite the high death toll.

June 2, 2014 / Al Jazeera by Jens Erik Gould, David Rochkind

Why doesn't tuberculosis attract as much attention—or get as much funding—as HIV or malaria?

June 2, 2014 / Cosmos by Meera Senthilingam

With South African patients carrying drug-resistant TB strains returning to their communities, researchers are turning to other methods of damage control.

May 29, 2014 / CNN by Meera Senthilingam

Drug-resistant TB is on the rise, with some strains immune to all major drugs.

May 27, 2014 / Untold Stories by Philip Brasher

Ethiopia is a country in a hurry—and under construction.

May 27, 2014 / Ozymandias by Michael Edison Hayden

In a country where malnutrition is still an epidemic, what positive effect did Narendra Modi's emphasis on privatization have on the 20 percent of Gujarati citizens living below the poverty line?

May 5, 2014 / Forbes by Esha Chhabra

In Bhutan, there are only eight ophthalmologists. With a population of roughly 750,000, that’s about 90,000 patients for each eye doctor. The answer is not in more funding but smarter infrastructure.

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