September 23, 2016 by Laura Kasinof

Some 1.1 million migrants came to seek asylum in Germany’s borders in 2015 and more are on their way. What's life like for refugees after they arrive?

Au pair Lucila Espinosa Milay checks her receipt as she walks through a row of money transfer businesses after wiring part of her paycheck to siblings back in the Philippines, at Central Station in Copenhagen, Denmark, May 21, 2016. Milay pays the school fees for several of her eight siblings back home, sending money every 15 days. Remittances are a huge economic driver in the Philippines. Image by Allison Shelley. Philippines, 2016.
September 23, 2016 / Daily Mail by Ana P. Santos

On paper, the au pair program is a cultural exchange program. But for many people, the motivations are economic relief rather than cultural immersion.

Migrants at Wien Westbahnhof railway station on their way to Germany. Image by Bwag courtesy Wikimedia Commons.  Austria, 2015.
September 23, 2016 / Latterly by Laura Kasinof

Being a refugee in Europe means joy, anxiety and enduring nasty looks from the locals.

Kathak dancer and social activist, Pakistan
September 21, 2016 / Untold Stories by Ikra Javed

Pakistan's trans women are back under the spotlight—only this time quite literally. Six khawaja siras take the stage, sharing their stories in comic, entertaining and musical ways.

Iris-scanners like this one, attached to ATM machines at branches of Cairo Amman Bank across Jordan, allow registered refugees to access their UNHCR cash assistance and money for food assistance, issues by the World Food Program. Refugees have their iris scanned when they first register with UNHCR. This data is cross-referenced when they access their benefits through the ATMs. Image by Rachel Townzen. Jordan, 2016.
September 21, 2016 / News Deeply by Rachel Townzen

In light of the U.N. Summit for Refugees and Migrants in New York, Rachel Townzen explores what it means for Syrians and Syrian refugees to stay safe in a tech-driven world where new technologies and...

Trekking through the heart of the Darien Gap. Photo by Carlos Villalon. Colombia, 2016.
September 21, 2016 / SBS: Dateline by Jason Motlagh

What would you risk for a better life? Dateline journeys through one of the world’s most dangerous jungles, a route populated by drug traffickers, bandits and migrants searching for a new beginning.

The Dateline team pushed deeper into the Darien jungle. Image by Carlos Villalon. Colombia, 2016.
September 20, 2016 / News.com.au by Jason Motlagh

There are plenty of reasons the 150km stretch of wilderness between Colombia and Panama is known as the “world’s most dangerous journey."

September 20, 2016 / Untold Stories by Christian Belanger

Christian Belanger reports on the tense relationship between the government and the street traders and scrap metal collectors who contribute to the township's informal economy. Would regulation help?

September 19, 2016 by Christian Belanger

The South African government is working to reform Alexandra Township, one of the poorest, most densely populated areas of Johannesburg, still struggling to overcome the legacy of apartheid. Can it...

A property in Old Alex, the densest part of Alexandra township
September 19, 2016 / Untold Stories by Christian Belanger

Since 2001, millions of dollars have been spent to improve a poor Johannesburg township. Residents say, however, that the project has often failed to meet their needs.

candoni camp
September 17, 2016 / Untold Stories by Holly Gambrell

In Candoni, a Roma camp, five Roma women are breaking out of their traditional roles to start their own business in hopes of bettering their futures.

September 17, 2016 / Untold Stories by Holly Gambrell

The Roma have been discriminated against in Italy from the time they first arrived in the country in 1400 to the present day. Will the Italian government's plan for inclusion help matters?

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