Kraków’s town hall decorated for Flag Day. Image by Ben Mauk. Poland, 2017.
January 20, 2017 / Granta by Ben Mauk

Ben Mauk visits Poland to investigate the role of the foreigner in a country that has embraced illiberal populism.

Image by Anton Zelenov, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.
January 19, 2017 / The New York Review of Books by James Fenton

Nearly 6,000 drug dealers and users in the Philippines have been summarily executed since President Rodrigo Duterte took office in June.

The author Tan Hecheng stands on "Widow's Bridge," where dozens of people were clubbed to death and thrown into the river in a wave of genocide that took place in 1967. These sorts of hidden histories still haunt the new superpower. Image by Sim Chi Yin/ VII Photo Agency. China, 2016.
January 13, 2017 / The New York Review of Books by Ian Johnson

Put your butcher's sword down! Latest in my series of Q&As with leading Chinese thinkers about China's past, present and future. I traveled to rural China with Tan to look at the scene of a...

Close to 40 men and women sit around a table and share a meal inside the kitchen of the shelter.
January 13, 2017 by Xyza Bacani

Singapore is a prosperous country in Asia and migrant workers have played an important role in its success, but at what cost?

Two protesters, Sara and Sunny, holding signs in solidarity with the khawaja sira community.  Signs right to left read: "Let us live, too" and  "Government members, stop discriminating against khawaja siras." Image by Ikra Javed. Pakistan, 2016.
January 12, 2017 / Untold Stories by Ikra Javed

The international LGBT movement is far from over, but rarely does change come without passion— and protests. Though maybe just the start, see what some Pakistanis did to combat transgender abuse.

A church in Singapore where some migrant workers worship. Image by Xyza Bacani. Singapore, 2016.
January 12, 2017 / The New York Times by Xyza Bacani

Migrant workers are invisible people,We are like air. People need us but they don’t see us. We exist to please them, to serve them, but they don’t really see us as part of the society.

A young Syrian refugee packs tea boxes under a table in a Turkish factory near his refugee camp on the Turkey-Syria border.
January 10, 2017 / WNYC Radio by Malia Politzer, Emily Kassie

Journalists Malia Politzer and Emily Kassie discuss their project in the HuffingtonPost Highline, “The 21st Century Gold Rush: How the refugee crisis is changing the world economy."

St. Theresa Point tipi
January 9, 2017 / Untold Stories by Dillon DeWitt

Life in the northern reserve of St. Theresa Point is demanding, but strengthening and protecting Oji-Cree culture is the greatest priority. In that regard, the reserve has had astounding success.

Teacher Ou Shuiming's class photographed in 1983.
January 4, 2017 by Rong Xiaoqing

Why are people who were smuggled to the U.S. from a rural high school in China three decades ago now going back to China?

January 4, 2017 / Foreign Policy by Rong Xiaoqing

Before she died in prison, 'Sister Ping' smuggled thousands from an obscure middle school to U.S. shores. Some now wish they'd never left.

Tan Hecheng at a tombstone put up by Zhou Qun for her husband and three children, who were among the thousands of people killed during the Cultural Revolution in Dao County. Image by Sim Chi Yin. China/VII, 2016.
January 3, 2017 / The New York Review of Books by Ian Johnson

Ian Johnson goes to a remote Chinese province to write about an unknown case of genocide in the Cultural Revolution, a case that helps broaden the scope of Mao-era killings.

A bus in San Pedro Sula awaits deportees from detention centers in the US. Image by Emily Gogolak. United States, 2016.
December 26, 2016 / The Nation by Emily Gogolak

Families fleeing extreme violence in Honduras and seeking asylum in the U.S. were detained in for-profit detention centers in Texas and deported to that same violence without adequate due process.

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