Image by Kenneth R. Weiss. Kiribati, 2014.
February 22, 2015 by Kenneth R. Weiss

As the low-lying island nation of Kiribati edges closer to a climate change end game, what will happen to its people, its territory, its sovereignty?

December 22, 2014 by Katie Mathieson

Patagonia, a region shared by Argentina and Chile, is well known for its unparalled panoramic views, unblemished status and remoteness. What will be the impact of a mega-project for dam construction?

September 12, 2014 by Robert Eric Shoemaker

Robert Eric Shoemaker presents a multimedia excavation of the artisans of Venice through the lens of climate change: a conversation between art and science.

Buariki Village leaders and Professor Pelenise Alofa (center), in front of a newly completed rainwater tank. Image by Janice Cantieri. Kiribati, 2014.
August 11, 2014 by Janice Cantieri

Washington University student fellow Janice Cantieri examines the impact of rising sea levels and climate change on life in Kiribati, the first nation facing displacement due to global warming.

Turkana, Kenya. Image by Guillaume Bonn. Kenya, 2014.
July 30, 2014 by Jessica Hatcher, Marc Hofer

Turkana in Kenya’s arid north is the most important place you’ve likely never heard of, quintessential to understanding mankind. Now, Turkana has oil. Is it a pending resource-curse catastrophe?

Image by Alex MacLean. Canada, 2014.
June 9, 2014 by Dan Grossman, Alex MacLean

Alberta’s oil sands region is at the heart of the KeystoneXL pipeline controversy. A project built on aerial photographs from 1,000 feet up brings into sharp focus the project's scale—and stakes.

Image by Joanne Silberner. Fiji, 2014.
May 7, 2014 by Joanne Silberner

Climate change has already destroyed homes and crops. But what is it doing to mental health?

Image by Jonathan Vigliotti. Greenland, 2013.
May 1, 2014 by Jonathan Vigliotti

Polar bears in Greenland struggle to find food as climate change chips away at Arctic ice. Climatologists say the resulting bear vs. human conflict is a warning for communities worldwide.

Sea Change: The Pacific’s Perilous Turn
September 13, 2013 by Craig Welch, Steve Ringman

In 2009, The Seattle Times reported that ocean acidification – the plummeting pH of seas from carbon-dioxide emissions – was killing billions of Northwest oysters. That was only the beginning.

Image by Justin Catanoso. Peru, 2013.
August 27, 2013 by Justin Catanoso

In the most biologically diverse place on earth, rising temperatures are causing trees and plants to adapt. Can they do so fast enough?

July 30, 2013 by Yves Eudes, Olivier Truc

Global warming is happening faster around the Arctic Ocean than anywhere else. To adjust to this new climate, local communities must change the way they live and work – for better and for worse.

August 1, 2012 by Sean Gallagher

Rising temperatures on the Tibetan Plateau in western China are causing melting glaciers and environmental degradation, threatening the vulnerable communities that inhabit the roof of the world.

Pages