Fragile States

The Skytrain in central Bangkok, part of the the city's mass transit. Image by Richard Bernstein. Thailand, 2017.
August 21, 2017 / Field Notes
by Richard Bernstein

Asia may not have caught up with the United States in technology, wealth, or power, but its subway systems are impressive compared to some of those in crumbling urban America.

Murals of Palestinians killed by Israel decorate the walls around Qalandia village near the checkpoint. Image by Matt Kennard. West Bank, 2016.
August 18, 2017
by Matt Kennard, Claire Provost

In this project, Matt Kennard and Claire Provost examine an industry that deals in services that have long been considered duties of national police and military forces.

An exhibition at a Taipei bookstore shows once banned publications, reminders of the years before Taiwan became a democracy with a sometimes contentious legislature. Image by Yan Luzhang (@0926yandeer). Taiwan, 2017.
August 17, 2017 / Field Notes
by Richard Bernstein

A fracas in Taiwan's legislature may have been prompted by Chinese meddling—or at least that suspicion shows that Mainland China is never far from the collective mind on Taiwan.

The Skytrain in central Bangkok, part of the the city's mass transit. Image by Richard Bernstein. Thailand, 2017.
August 17, 2017
by Richard Bernstein

While the U.S. lives through the domestic storms of the Trump presidency, China is moving boldly in Asia, with historic consequences for American friends, from Taiwan to Thailand.

A Syrian family watches as Gayle Tzemach Lemmon conducts an interview. Image by Jon Gerberg/PBS NewsHour. Syria, 2017.
August 17, 2017 / PBS NewsHour
by Gayle Tzemach Lemmon

The kids were everywhere — full of joy, full of spirit, full of exhaustion. Full of life. And they both inspired and broke my heart.

Still image taken from PBS NewsHour video, Syrians try to salvage life from the wreckage of Raqqa. Aired August 16, 2017.
August 17, 2017 / PBS NewsHour
by Gayle Tzemach Lemmon

On the outskirts of Raqqa, amid death and destruction, there are signs of life—and hope. Tens of thousands of Syrian families are living in rubble, preparing for a future after ISIS.

Still from PBS NewsHour broadcast, August 16, 2017.
August 17, 2017
by Gayle Tzemach Lemmon

The Syrian war: We see the headlines, but know far less about the people caught in the conflict's crosshairs. What comes next for them, and how will that impact the future of the country and the...

Lee Ching-yu, the wife of the Taiwanese human rights activist imprisoned in China, at the office in Taipei where she studies the history of Taiwan's democratic movement. Image by Richard Bernstein. Taiwan, 2017.
August 17, 2017 / The New York Review of Books
by Richard Bernstein

Since her husband, the Taiwanese activist Lee Ming-che, was arrested in China, Lee Ching-yu has been at the center of an uphill struggle even to learn where he is, much less get him released.

August 16, 2017

This lesson, designed for journalists and journalism students, uses the film "Facing Risk" to guide a conversation about the impact of reporting dangerous stories on journalists and their families.

The Huajian shoe factory in Addis Ababa employs thousands of Ethiopians. Image by Noah Fowler. Ethiopia, 2017.
August 14, 2017 / Field Notes
by Jonathan Kaiman, Noah Fowler

We spent a week following the rail from Addis Ababa, where China is leading an urban renaissance, to Djibouti, where it's building its first overseas military base.

The Central Business District rises up behind a park in Nairobi. Image by Noah Fowler. Kenya, 2017.
August 10, 2017 / Field Notes
by Jonathan Kaiman, Noah Fowler

We traveled to Kajiado, Kenya, to find that China's effort to win African hearts and minds has been paying off.

Villagers gamble at the Chinese machines in a roadside shack in Zamashegu. Image by Noah Fowler. Ghana, 2017.
August 9, 2017 / Field Notes
by Jonathan Kaiman, Noah Fowler

We heard that Chinese entrepreneurs had sparked a gambling epidemic in Ghana, and found a bigger problem than we imagined.