Global Health: Reproductive Health

A three-wheeled keki tries to burrow its way through the Lagosian traffic. Image by T.R. Goldman. Nigeria, 2017.
November 14, 2017 / Field Notes
by T.R. Goldman

Use Uber, get a local phone number, and above all, don't schedule more than two sit-down interviews a day.

Trucks navigate a closed portion of the Abuja-Lokoja highway in Nigeria by crossing a water-filled median to the other lane. Image by T.R. Goldman. Nigeria, 2017.
November 13, 2017 / Field Notes
by T.R. Goldman

How important to a story are the very things that make Nigeria different from the U.S.?

A newborn infant at the Okene Zonal Hospital in Kogi State, Nigeria. The infant survived a cord prolapse, which normally calls for an emergency C-section, after waiting for 12 hours until his family had collected enough money to pay for the delivery. Image by T.R. Goldman. Nigeria, 2017.
November 10, 2017 / Field Notes
by T.R. Goldman

A look at the challenges of providing health care in Nigeria.

Fatima Yakubu, a Nigerian community health extension worker, holds tubes of chlorhexidine digluconate 7.1 percent gel. Yakubu’s rural primary health care facility is one of about 120 clinics in the central Nigerian state of Kogi that are supported by USAID’s Maternal and Child Survival Program. Image by T.R. Goldman. Nigeria, 2017.
November 10, 2017 / Health Affairs
by T.R. Goldman

Here’s how one Nigerian state tackled the deadly bacterial infections that kill hundreds of thousands of babies worldwide each year—and why such a simple solution is so tough to pull off.

The operating theater at the Okene Zonal Hospital in Kogi State, Nigeria. Image by T.R. Goldman. Nigeria, 2017.
November 10, 2017
by T.R. Goldman

Here’s how one Nigerian state tackled the deadly bacterial infections that kill hundreds of thousands of babies worldwide each year—and why such a seemingly simple solution is so tough to pull off.

October 23, 2017
by Rob Tinworth, Rebecca Kaplan

What if there were an algorithm for saving the most lives? Global healthcare depends on decisions increasingly driven by Big Data, but who, and what, gets lost in the number crunching?

Filmmaker Rob Tinworth and Professor Sara Shipley Hiles at the screening of "The Life Equation" at the Reynolds Journalism Institute at the University of Missouri School of Journalism. Image by Kem Knapp Sawyer, United States, 2017.
September 10, 2017
by Rob Tinworth, Kem Knapp Sawyer

Filmmaker Rob Tinworth provokes debate on global health priorities during visit to Missouri School of Journalism, one of our newest Campus Consortium partners.

September 4, 2017
by Anna Nemtsova, Sophia Jones

The HIV/AIDS epidemic is at a tipping point in Russia, where an estimated 1-1.5 million people are HIV positive and the Kremlin has long rejected international assistance. Women are being left behind...

Dr. Yelena Orlova-Morozova listens to a lecture at Moscow's non-gernment AIDS.Center. Image by Anna Nemtsova. Russia, 2017.
September 4, 2017 / PRI's The World
by Anna Nemtsova, Sophia Jones

In Russia, the stigma around AIDS is so strong it has hindered response and allowed the disease to spread.

August 31, 2017
by Rob Tinworth, Kem Knapp Sawyer

What if there were an algorithm for saving the most lives? Global healthcare depends on decisions increasingly driven by Big Data. An evidence-based approach promises to transform the lives of...

July 12, 2017
by Alexis Okeowo, Tom Hundley

Pulitzer Center at NABJ 2017 National Convention and Career Fair. Come pitch your international stories!

World Health Summit conference. Image courtesy of World Health Summit.
July 5, 2017

The World Health Summit is accepting applications for its 2017 "Next Generation of Science Journalists" award, co-sponsored by the Pulitzer Center.