Women, Children, Crisis

Elderly widows cook next to their beds at Tarash Mandir, a short-stay home for young women and permanent facility for elderly widows in Vrindavan. Image by Amy Toensing. India, 2016.
April 17, 2017
by Ifath Sayed, Amy Toensing

Amy Toensing visited Guilford College to present her Pulitzer Center-supported project, "A World of Widows."

This young Kazakh girl in Western Mongolia was helping her mom milk the goats. Image by Atul Prasad, National Geographic Your Shot.
April 17, 2017
by Jordan Roth

The "Strong Women" assignment asks contributors to share the stories of strong women in their lives.

Screenshot by Arthur Jones II. United States, 2017.
April 14, 2017 / The New Yorker
by Ben Taub

Ben Taub talks about his journey to uncover human trafficking in this video.

Christmas Day. Image by Diana Markosian. Germany, 2017.
April 14, 2017 / Untold Stories
by Diana Markosian

Milad, a 14-year old refugee from a small village in Afghanistan, travels by foot, car and rubber boat to Germany where he celebrates Christmas for the first time.

Fatumah is a single teenage mother living in Mukon, Uganda. She was unable to finish secondary school because the school fees were too expensive for her parents. Fatumah supports her family through subsistence agriculture and occasional work as a cleaner, while also shouldering the burden of fetching water and doing household chores. An aspiring business owner, Fatumah attends entrepreneurship workshops at a local NGO twice a week. Image by Mariana Krueger. Uganda.
April 13, 2017
by Jordan Roth, Amy Toensing

National Geographic photographer, Amy Toensing and Deputy Director of Photography, Whitney Johnson, select the final photographs for Your Shot assignment.

April 12, 2017
by Diana Markosian

"A Postcard Home" is a collaborative series exploring a remarkable chapter in human migration through the viewpoint of a child.

Abebech Yacob was 14 years old when she was cut. “They tied my legs with rope,” she recalled. “I was bleeding almost 12 hours. I was almost dead.” Image by Amy Yee. Ethiopia, 2016.
April 6, 2017 / Undark
by Amy Yee

As in many parts of the world, the painful ritual persists in Ethiopia despite official bans. But community conversations can help — in multiple ways.

Blessing and two other teen-age Nigerian girls watch a rainbow over the short stretch of water separating Sicily from mainland Italy. Eighty percent of young Nigerian women who cross the Mediterranean are trafficked into sexual exploitation. Image by Ben Taub. Italy, 2017.
April 4, 2017
by Tom Hundley

This week: the incredible migrant trail of one woman, Bangladesh's toxic leather tanneries, and the Maldives losing battle agains climate change and losing democracy.

Roughly a hundred and fifty people wait to be rescued from an inflatable dinghy in the Mediterranean Sea, twenty miles north of Libya. The boat left with only enough fuel to reach international waters. Image by Ben Taub. Libya, 2016.
April 3, 2017 / NPR
by Ben Taub

NPR's Kelly McEvers interviews Ben Taub about the reporting process for a story on human trafficking across the Sahara and the Mediterranean.

April 3, 2017

This lesson uses a photo essay as primary source so students can identify the Seven Economic Principles in a real world situation, and is most effective with students who have a basic understanding...

Roughly a hundred and fifty people wait to be rescued from an inflatable dinghy in the Mediterranean Sea, twenty miles north of Libya. The boat left with only enough fuel to reach international waters. Image by Ben Taub. Libya, 2016.
April 3, 2017 / The New Yorker
by Ben Taub

Every year, thousands of teen-agers from one city in Nigeria risk death and endure forced labor and sex work on the long route to Europe.

Blessing and two other teen-age Nigerian girls watch a rainbow over the short stretch of water separating Sicily from mainland Italy. Eighty percent of young Nigerian women who cross the Mediterranean are trafficked into sexual exploitation. Image by Ben Taub. Italy, 2017.
April 3, 2017
by Ben Taub

Most African migrants heading to Europe unwittingly follow the ancient caravan routes of the trans-Saharan slave trade. Along the way, many are trafficked, sold, and brutally exploited.