January 25, 2016 / Untold Stories by Sharron Lovell

During the course of the year that I filmed him, fisherman Cao Suizhou’s hair turned from jet black to white, a potent sign of stress for a man who otherwise endures his worries in silence.

January 20, 2016 / PRI's The World by Ari Daniel

Scientists in Greenland are using cutting edge technology to track tiny changes to predict what a warmer future might hold for the island's giant ice pack and the rest of the world.

January 20, 2016 / PRI's The World by Ari Daniel

A few of Greenland's biggest glaciers began melting a decade ago. And scientists are trying to puzzle out a mystery story with big consequences for the future of the island's fast-melting ice sheet.

January 5, 2016 / Foreign Policy by Sharron Lovell

What China's huge water transfer project means for those at both ends of the pipeline.

December 22, 2015 / Untold Stories by Jonathan Rashad

Peter Schwartzstein, Leyland Cecco, and Jonathan Rashad traveled from Ethiopia's Lake Tana, the White Nile in Sudan, to the Nile Delta in Egypt where the Nile empties into the Mediterranean Sea.

December 14, 2015 / USA Today by Ian James, Steve Elfers

In Peru, thriving agribusiness, declining aquifers and conflicts over water.

December 13, 2015 / Quartz by Leyland Cecco, Peter Schwartzstein

Having lost its oil, Sudan is pinning its economic hopes on gold. But the slave-like conditions in which the miners work, and continuing US sanctions will likely keep Western investors away for now.

December 10, 2015 / USA Today by Ian James, Steve Elfers

Barren fields in Morocco reveal risks of severe depletion in North Africa.

December 10, 2015 / USA Today by Ian James, Steve Elfers

In India, some areas are rapidly running out of groundwater.

December 10, 2015 / USA Today by Ian James, Steve Elfers

Dry wells and sinking ground as state struggles with groundwater crisis.

December 10, 2015 / USA Today by Ian James, Steve Elfers

Nationwide analysis shows depletion of groundwater widespread and worsening.

December 2, 2015 / Newsweek by Peter Schwartzstein

The ancient Nile camel trade is crumbling, and with it the livelihoods of thousands of Egyptians and Sudanese. Climate change has claimed many of the grazing lands; war has also exacted a deadly cost...

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