Going Nuclear

Images from projects by Alexandria Bombach, Ben Solomon, Jon Cohen Kit Raone and Evey Wilson. Collage by Lauren Shepherd. United States, 2017.
May 1, 2017
by Ben Solomon, Scott Anderson

Two Pulitzer Center-supported projects win CINE awards for virtual reality and short documentary journalism. Three are finalists in documentary short and nonfiction series categories.

February 27, 2017
by Daniel Sagalyn, Jamie McIntyre

Join the Pulitzer Center and our partners at the 2017 Environmental Film Festival as we consider the impact of nuclear weapons–from the US moderization programs to Russia's use of nuclear shields to...

February 20, 2017

In this lesson, students will explore a special issue of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists about the use of nuclear power to address climate change. They will present one of the...

Pulitzer fellow Rachel Oswald and her fixer, Dmitry Saltykovsky, interview Russian-Tajik boys attending Patriot Park, a government-funded permanent exhibition outside of Moscow designed to showcase Russian military strength. Image by Ulia Zamiatina. Russia, 2016.
February 6, 2017
by Rachel Oswald

CQ Roll Call foreign policy reporter Rachel Oswald discusses her summer 2015 Pulitzer Center reporting trip to Moscow where she focused on the breakdown in U.S.-Russia nuclear confidence.

Map of nuclear power reactor construction.
January 30, 2017
by Rachel Bronson

This project investigates the important emerging political debate about whether or not nuclear power can reduce the threats posed by climate change. 

Nuclear power plant in Cattenom, France. Image by Stefan Kühn courtesy of Wikimedia Commons. France, 2005.
January 17, 2017
by Tom Hundley

This week: nuclear power's role in combatting global warming, the hidden lives of migrant workers, and what America gave El Salvador.

The Doomsday clock, the logo of The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, showing two and a half minutes to midnight.
January 11, 2017 / Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists
by The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists

Using nuclear power to replace coal-based fossil fuel power plants worldwide by 2100 is technically possible. Whether this can actually be accomplished is a more complicated matter.

Logo for the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists.
January 11, 2017 / Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists
by The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists

Does climate change really justify the support now being demanded by the nuclear industry?

The Doomsday Clock, the logo of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, showing two and a half minutes to midnight.
January 11, 2017 / Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists
by The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists

Nuclear energy is needed to meet the goals of the 2015 Paris Agreement on climate change, and the largest emitters of greenhouse gasses plan to use nuclear power in some way for the climate crisis.

Nuclear power
January 10, 2017
by Rachel Bronson, John Mecklin

Can and should nuclear power play a significant role in combating climate change?

Interactive visualization on nuclear power reactor construction. A special issue of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientist.
January 10, 2017 / Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists
by Rachel Bronson, John Mecklin

Nuclear power advocates claim that nuclear power is essential for a low-carbon future, but critics say otherwise.

The Doomsday clock, the logo of The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, showing two and a half minutes to midnight.
January 4, 2017 / Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists
by John Mecklin

Nuclear power and its role in the ongoing dilemma of climate change.