Global Goods, Local Costs

It takes an army to maintain rhinos on a reserve. Captured here, the entire team works with wildlife veterinarian Dr. Fowlds to push a rhino onto its stomach to keep its lungs from collapsing during a small procedure. On average, a white rhino weighs around 4,000 lbs. Image by Kelsey Emery. South Africa, 2017.
August 29, 2017 by Kelsey Emery

South African wildlife sits on the brink of disaster as rhinos continue to be poached. With so much at stake, villagers fight to protect the keystone species, resources, and the tourism industry.

Azindo Nchegir is a subsistence farmer and agent for the Chinese gambling machines in Zamashegu. Image by Noah Fowler. Ghana, 2017.
August 5, 2017 by Jonathan Kaiman, Noah Fowler

Across Africa, the era of U.S. and European hegemony is ending. As China fills the gap, the continent is changing in ways we’re only beginning to understand.

May 29, 2017 by Larry C. Price

Years of unmitigated contamination from Zambia's largest lead mine have created a toxic nightmare for the residents of Kabwe, the country's second largest city.

People play soccer as dusk falls on the village of Adjuma Kondre in Suriname. The village's water sources have been impacted by Alcoa's nearby mining operations. Image by Stephanie Strasburg. Suriname, 2017.
April 23, 2017 by Rich Lord, Len Boselovic

Multinational Alcoa, in a restructuring, departs struggling Suriname after 100 years. The loose ends include a hydroelectric dam, two company towns, a long-loyal workforce, and a sputtering economy.

A Rohingya refugee displays her scars. Image by Doug Bock Clark. Myanmar, 2017.
April 19, 2017 by Doug Bock Clark, Corey Pattison

As Myanmar emerges from half a century of isolation to join the globalized world, Doug Bock Clark and Corey Pattison will report on the forces struggling to shape the country's future.

Women working at a small, temporary brick factory in Malda village. While most of the laborers at this factory were local relatives of the owner, the industry is notorious for exploiting migrant labor. Image by Yardain Amron. India, 2016.
April 14, 2017 by Yardain Amron

Each winter hundreds of thousands of Indians migrate north to man the world's second largest brick industry. They're promised opportunity, but many are bonded into debt.

March 1, 2017 by Caitlin J. Cotter

An Andean village has battled severe lead toxicity from ceramics production, and now residents face the challenges of alternative glazing compounds or abandoning their cottage industry altogether.

Local farmers are seen at the so-called market, a collection center for cotton, in a village near Dano. Image by Jošt Franko. Burkina Faso, 2015.
December 14, 2016 by Meta Krese, Jošt Franko

From cotton farms in Burkina Faso to sweatshops in Bangladesh and Romania, a story of the real costs of our globalized economy.

Image by Mark Olalde. South Africa, 2016.
October 13, 2016 by Mark Olalde

More than 6,000 abandoned mines pierce South African soil, and the nation is now left to deal with the environmental and social rehabilitation from what was once its most important industry.

October 11, 2016 by Rachel Nuwer

Demand for animals vastly outstrips availability. What are the forces driving the current poaching crisis, what we stand to lose if species fall, and what is being done to stop the killing?

Land reclamation works are on-going at this area of Tuas, Singapore's westernmost area where a new massive container port—the world's largest in the next 30 years—is being built. The port authority is using materials dredged from the nearby seabed and earth excavated from tunneling work on a subway line to cut use of sand by about 70 per cent in the building of this pier—which will be one of four eventually. Singapore has been short of sand for its sizeable and continual land reclamation and construction work, having bought sand from its neighboring Southeast Asian countries for decades. Image by Sim Chi Yin. Singapore, 2017.
July 29, 2016 by Vince Beiser, Sim Chi Yin

Concrete. Glass. Silicon. Our civilization is built on the most important yet most overlooked commodity in the world: sand. And we are starting to run out.

Image by Camila DeChalus. Colombia, 2016.
July 28, 2016 by Camila DeChalus

Camila DeChalus directed and produced a video for her project about how, with help from the Catholic Church, coffee farmers in rural Colombia are fighting against the impacts of climate change.