Carletonville sinkhole
December 1, 2016 / The Star by Mark Olalde

Five decades of mining on the Far West Rand outside Johannesburg contributed to the formation of more than 1,000 sinkholes. As companies abandon mines, many fear this will set off new sinkholes.

President Jacob Zuma speaks to Parliament in October about the marine economy. Courtesy: Republic of South Africa. South Africa, 2016.
November 23, 2016 / Inter Press Service by Mark Olalde

Southern Africa finds itself at the center of the offshore bulk sediment mining debate as international companies rush to strip mine phosphate deposits in coastal waters of South Africa and Namibia.

Workers at John Hume's rhino ranch prepare to remove the horn of a rhino. Image by Rachel Nuwer. South Africa, 2016.
November 22, 2016 / Newsweek by Rachel Nuwer

Legalizing trade in rhinoceros horns could help save the species, but some experts worry it might stimulate demand and encourage poachers.

The tide rolls in on the shores of Cape Town, South Africa. Prospecting rights for offshore mining cover 10 percent of the country's exclusive marine economic zone. Image by Mark Olalde. South Africa, 2016.
November 12, 2016 / Oxpeckers by Mark Olalde

Offshore mining prospecting rights cover 10 percent of South Africa's marine economic zone. With the country's inability to properly close mines, a large opposition movement fears offshore mining.

David van Wyk tests water quality in streams near piles of mine waste in Riverlea. Image by Mark Olalde. South Africa, 2016.
October 16, 2016 / Oxpeckers by Mark Olalde

Activists face uphill battles when they push back against mining companies. Their stories include violence, secret deals, a lack of access to information and unenforced laws.

Image by Mark Olalde. South Africa, 2016.
October 13, 2016 by Mark Olalde

More than 6,000 abandoned mines pierce South African soil, and the nation is now left to deal with the environmental and social rehabilitation from what was once its most important industry.

A stream meanders through a wetland in Wakkerstroom, Mpumalanga. The region is a Strategic Water Source Area, the segments of South Africa, Lesotho and Swaziland that make up 8 percent of land area but account for 50 percent of water supply. Image by Mark Olalde. South Africa, 2016.
October 12, 2016 / Inter Press Service by Mark Olalde

With South Africa in the midst of a historic drought, the government continues to allow ambitious prospecting for coal mines in water-sensitive areas.

High-voltage power lines carry electricity from coal-fired power plants in Mpumalanga toward Gauteng. Image by Mark Olalde. South Africa, 2016.
October 12, 2016 / Oxpeckers by Mark Olalde

A controversial underground coal mine in a protected water catchment in Mpumalanga has moved closer to breaking ground after it was granted environmental authorisation and a water use licence.

October 11, 2016 by Rachel Nuwer

Demand for animals vastly outstrips availability. What are the forces driving the current poaching crisis, what we stand to lose if species fall, and what is being done to stop the killing?

Peru is among many countries undergoing rapid aging, with the proportion of the population over the age of 60 projected to rise from 9.2 percent in 2014 to 22.7 percent in 2050. Advances in medicine, improvements in sanitation and economic prosperity have led to longer life expectancies, while family planning has resulted in falling birth rates across the globe. In low and middle-income families, rapid aging can be a double-edged sword due to limited resource availability, deteriorating family support and i
October 5, 2016 / Viewfind by Jordan Roth, kem knapp sawyer

Pulitzer Center student fellows travel the world to report on issues that affect us all—telling stories that might otherwise go untold. This exhibit features selected work by student fellows, shot on...

Representatives from more than 100 countries prepare to vote on pangolin protection at the CITES conference in Johannesburg. Image by Rachel Nuwer.  South Africa, 2016.
October 5, 2016 / The New York Times by Rachel Nuwer

Found in Africa and Asia, scaly anteaters are thought to be the world’s most trafficked mammal.

Fishers face sand dredges in Hamashu village, Lake Poyang. Image by Vince Beiser. China, 2016.
September 26, 2016 / CBC News by Vince Beiser

The world's forests are being stripped away. Aquifers are being depleted at an alarming rate. But very few of us have ever imagined that we are also running out of sand. Vince Beiser speaks with CBC...

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