Issue

Haiti: After the Quake

The initial shock of the 2010 earthquake has passed, but Haiti continues its struggle to overcome both man-made and natural disasters. Amidst the rubble, a devastated infrastructure and untold suffering, there is also an unprecedented opportunity to build Haiti back better.

Haiti: After the Quake is a showcase of reporting projects produced by the Pulitzer Center in 2010. Through video, photography, interviews, articles, and even poetry, these projects explore the critical issues affecting Haiti's future: development, poverty, displacement, HIV/AIDS, educational reform, and the role of international aid.

Kwame Dawes, Lisa Armstrong and photographer Andre Lambertson made a total of 10 trips to Haiti during 2010. Their projects, “Resilience in a Ravaged Nation” and “After the Quake: HIV/AIDS in Haiti” document violence against vulnerable women in tent camps, the challenges faced by senior doctors at health organizations as well as portraits of individual Haitians simply fighting to survive.

In “Life on the Margins,” Stephen Sapienza and Stephanie Hanes document the growing marginalization of individuals of Haitian descent living in the Dominican Republic.
Paul Franz explores the challenges-and importance of-of education in post-quake Haiti in Rebuilding Haiti's Education System from the Ground Up.

Haiti's Reconstruction: Building Back Better features reports from William Wheeler and Justin Thomas Ostensen on why the international reconstruction efforts fall short, how those failures contributed to the outbreak of cholera, and what it will take to "build back better."

Haiti: After the Quake

Stranded: The Stateless Haitians

Up to a million Haitians, and descendants of Haitians, are being affected by a new law about citizenship in the Dominican Republic. Many could face deportation, despite being born in the country.

Haiti's Horrendous Teenage Prostitution Problem

Thousands of Haitians remain in camps in Port-au-Prince after a massive earthquake hit last year. Now, 16 months after the disaster, young girls are being forced to have sex in order to survive.

Haiti: Battling HIV Alone

When we met Jesula in May 2010, she was broken. She was 22, HIV positive, with a toddler and another baby on the way.

Why Men Rape

A man discusses why and how rape occurs in Champs de Mars, one of the most dangerous camps for those displaced by Haiti's quake.

Transition of Power Tests a Fragile Haiti

The relatively smooth course of the March 20th presidential election in Haiti has brought cautious optimism about the prospects for political stability in the country.

Writer Kwame Dawes Discusses the Intersection of Poetry and Journalism

Ghanaian-Jamaican writer and poet Kwame Dawes is the author of over a dozen collections of verse, including the critically-acclaimed "Wisteria: Poems From the Swamp Country." He has worked on the Emmy Award-winning Pulitzer Center reporting project Hope: Living and Loving with HIV in Jamaica and is currently working on Resilience in a Ravaged Nation: Haiti, After the Earthquake.

In this interview, Dawes discusses his work in Jamaica and Haiti and his use of poetry in journalism projects.

Resilience in a Ravaged Nation: Journalists Report on Haiti

Pulitzer Center-supported journalists Lisa Armstrong and Andre Lambertson present portraits of of hope and resilience as Haitian communities rebuild in the wake of catastrophe. Joining them are Fred de Sam Lazaro, director of the Project for Under-Told Stories at Saint John's University and a veteran journalist whose coverage includes developments in Haiti through the years, and Pulitzer Center Executive Director Jon Sawyer.

College of the Holy Cross, Worcester, MA, Rehm Library, March 29, 2010, 7:00 pm