Issue

Haiti: After the Quake

The initial shock of the 2010 earthquake has passed, but Haiti continues its struggle to overcome both man-made and natural disasters. Amidst the rubble, a devastated infrastructure and untold suffering, there is also an unprecedented opportunity to build Haiti back better.

Haiti: After the Quake is a showcase of reporting projects produced by the Pulitzer Center in 2010. Through video, photography, interviews, articles, and even poetry, these projects explore the critical issues affecting Haiti's future: development, poverty, displacement, HIV/AIDS, educational reform, and the role of international aid.

Kwame Dawes, Lisa Armstrong and photographer Andre Lambertson made a total of 10 trips to Haiti during 2010. Their projects, “Resilience in a Ravaged Nation” and “After the Quake: HIV/AIDS in Haiti” document violence against vulnerable women in tent camps, the challenges faced by senior doctors at health organizations as well as portraits of individual Haitians simply fighting to survive.

In “Life on the Margins,” Stephen Sapienza and Stephanie Hanes document the growing marginalization of individuals of Haitian descent living in the Dominican Republic.
Paul Franz explores the challenges-and importance of-of education in post-quake Haiti in Rebuilding Haiti's Education System from the Ground Up.

Haiti's Reconstruction: Building Back Better features reports from William Wheeler and Justin Thomas Ostensen on why the international reconstruction efforts fall short, how those failures contributed to the outbreak of cholera, and what it will take to "build back better."

Haiti: After the Quake

A Cancer Clinic in the Hills of Haiti

A health facility in rural Haiti has a program to detect and treat cancer, but a big challenge persists: How can they encourage Haitians to get cancer screening and treatments before it’s too late?

Haiti: Prostitution and Rape Increase after Quake

It is not as if teenage prostitution didn’t exist in Haiti before the January 2010 earthquake that left 1.5 million displaced, tens of thousands of them living in haphazardly-placed tents in scattered through the capital, Port-au-Prince. But in the months since, the number of girls, some as young as 8, who have been forced to have sex in order to survive has drastically increased. Not surprisingly, the number of rapes has also gone up.

Poet Kwame Dawes Visits Banneker High School

On Friday, December 17, Kwame Dawes, a poet, professor, and Pulitzer Center grantee, visited Benjamin Banneker Academic High School in Washington D.C.. During the visit, Dawes shared his latest project, "Voices from Haiti," an exploration of Haiti one year after the devastating January 2010 earthquake.

Haiti: Challenges to Reconstruction and the Election

The upcoming Presidential election in Haiti will determine the future course of reconstruction, raising concerns over the effects of the recent cholera outbreak, Hurricane Tomas and continuing internal displacement on the electoral process.

Haiti, After the Quake

When high school seniors from the School Without Walls in Washington, DC were asked what they've heard lately about Haiti by visiting Pulitzer Center journalists, they responded, "not much." Almost 10 months after the earthquake, media attention on Haiti has faded. The country's struggles have not.