Issue

Haiti: After the Quake

The initial shock of the 2010 earthquake has passed, but Haiti continues its struggle to overcome both man-made and natural disasters. Amidst the rubble, a devastated infrastructure and untold suffering, there is also an unprecedented opportunity to build Haiti back better.

Haiti: After the Quake is a showcase of reporting projects produced by the Pulitzer Center in 2010. Through video, photography, interviews, articles, and even poetry, these projects explore the critical issues affecting Haiti's future: development, poverty, displacement, HIV/AIDS, educational reform, and the role of international aid.

Kwame Dawes, Lisa Armstrong and photographer Andre Lambertson made a total of 10 trips to Haiti during 2010. Their projects, “Resilience in a Ravaged Nation” and “After the Quake: HIV/AIDS in Haiti” document violence against vulnerable women in tent camps, the challenges faced by senior doctors at health organizations as well as portraits of individual Haitians simply fighting to survive.

In “Life on the Margins,” Stephen Sapienza and Stephanie Hanes document the growing marginalization of individuals of Haitian descent living in the Dominican Republic.
Paul Franz explores the challenges-and importance of-of education in post-quake Haiti in Rebuilding Haiti's Education System from the Ground Up.

Haiti's Reconstruction: Building Back Better features reports from William Wheeler and Justin Thomas Ostensen on why the international reconstruction efforts fall short, how those failures contributed to the outbreak of cholera, and what it will take to "build back better."

Haiti: After the Quake

Panic Has Subsided, But Cholera Remains in Haiti

Two years after the onset of cholera in Haiti, efforts to improve public health practices, such as hand-washing and drinking purified water, are paying off. Daily routines are changing—albeit slowly.

Haiti and Water Poverty

"Water poverty" is difficult to calculate and harder to conceptualize. After cholera erupted in Haiti, what does water poverty mean to Haitians in their daily life?

A Home Run in Haiti

Two documentary filmmakers put pressure on the United Nations to accept the blame for Haiti's cholera outbreak—and they're doing it with a film about a young boy who loves baseball.

A Week in Port-au-Prince

Two years after the earthquake the Pulitzer Center visits Haiti, along with poet Kwame Dawes, for a special performance of the multimedia production “Voices of Haiti."

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