Issue

Global Health: Systems and Safety

Pulitzer Center grantees examine the quality and efficiency of healthcare infrastructure throughout the world, focusing on the need to provide affordable care, prevent future catastrophic outbreaks such as Ebola, rethink business models, and improve healthcare delivery through new diagnostic tools or mobile technology.

Special attention is paid to the healthcare systems in low-income countries where clinics in rural areas are few and far between, healthcare providers scarce, surgical treatment centers often non-existent—and where children under the age of five are 16 times more likely to die than those in high-income countries.

Our journalists also cover safety issues and injury-related deaths, including those caused by firearms, drowning, or car accidents. Our Roads Kill project features an interactive map with reports on road fatalities from around the world—an often neglected, yet preventable, global health crisis, in a world where every year an estimated 1.2 million people are killed in road traffic crashes.

Global Health: Systems and Safety

March 30, 2016

Two Years Later, Ebola Is a Ticking Time Bomb

Emily Baumgaertner

Ebola survivors could be carrying live Ebola virus in their eyes. Many of them are going blind, but in fear of the epidemic's resurgence, hardly anyone is doing anything about it.

March 28, 2016

Cuba's Headstart on Finding a Cure for AIDS

Rebecca Sananes

Cuban sanitariums are the government quarantine facilities for HIV positive people—critics called them prisons; supporters say they controlled the epidemic. Former residents say "it's complicated."

February 03, 2016

The Life Equation

Rob Tinworth, Miles O’Brien

Big Data is coming to global health. But who should decide who lives and dies: Doctors on the front lines or a mathematical formula?

February 03, 2016

Ebola Survivors

Seema Yasmin

As Liberia grapples to care for thousands of Ebola survivors, scientists strive to understand post-Ebola syndrome.

When BRCA Mutations Meet Complications

Hrafnhildur Sveinbjörnsdóttir had a double mastectomy after finding out she had a gene mutation linked to a high risk of breast cancer. But trying to avoid illness cost her her health.

A Bot to Watch Over Me

By 2025, Japan will face a shortage of 37,700 care workers. Robots are starting to find their way to households and nursing homes to fill the gap.

'Virtually Able'

Japan’s average life expectancy was the highest in the world, at 83.7 years in 2015. But what’s the point of living longer if you are not happy? Can seniors find happiness in a virtual journey?

Can Tech Sustain a Super-Aged Japan?

Japan has the largest percentage of older people in the world, with 27.3 percent of their citizens 65 and older. It has turned to technologies from VR to robotics to solve challenges of super-aging.

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