Issue

Global Health: Systems and Safety

Pulitzer Center grantees examine the quality and efficiency of healthcare infrastructure throughout the world, focusing on the need to provide affordable care, prevent future catastrophic outbreaks such as Ebola, rethink business models, and improve healthcare delivery through new diagnostic tools or mobile technology.

Special attention is paid to the healthcare systems in low-income countries where clinics in rural areas are few and far between, healthcare providers scarce, surgical treatment centers often non-existent—and where children under the age of five are 16 times more likely to die than those in high-income countries.

Our journalists also cover safety issues and injury-related deaths, including those caused by firearms, drowning, or car accidents. Our Roads Kill project features an interactive map with reports on road fatalities from around the world—an often neglected, yet preventable, global health crisis, in a world where every year an estimated 1.2 million people are killed in road traffic crashes.

Global Health: Systems and Safety

The Secret Car Horn Language Of Port-Au-Prince

Port-au-Prince, Haiti, is known for its terrible traffic, partly caused by lack of reliable street lights. So drivers there have come up with their own complicated language.

Cairo's Drivers' Roundabout

Egypt's drivers say poor quality roads dictate that they break traffic rules. The country's road planners say it's pointless to make improvements if people won't abide by traffic regulations.

Zika’s Enduring Impacts in Brazil

A new Human Rights Watch report finds that conditions that enabled the Zika epidemic in Brazil were not addressed —leaving the country, especially women and girls, at risk for future outbreaks.

Pathway to Peril

Scientists worry the next devastating disease could be born where animals and humans mix in a Third World slum – then cross the globe. Zika may have been a preview.

Can Malaria Be Stopped?

Inadequate medical care, substandard sanitation, and counterfeit drugs are just some of the reasons why malaria continues to claim millions of lives worldwide. Could chemoprevention be the answer?

This Week: The White Plague

Pulitzer Center grantee Meera Senthilingam, in a report for CNN Health, notes that tuberculosis has long been known as a disease of poverty.

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