Issue

Global Health: Systems and Safety

Pulitzer Center grantees examine the quality and efficiency of healthcare infrastructure throughout the world, focusing on the need to provide affordable care, prevent future catastrophic outbreaks such as Ebola, rethink business models, and improve healthcare delivery through new diagnostic tools or mobile technology.

Special attention is paid to the healthcare systems in low-income countries where clinics in rural areas are few and far between, healthcare providers scarce, surgical treatment centers often non-existent—and where children under the age of five are 16 times more likely to die than those in high-income countries.

Our journalists also cover safety issues and injury-related deaths, including those caused by firearms, drowning, or car accidents. Our Roads Kill project features an interactive map with reports on road fatalities from around the world—an often neglected, yet preventable, global health crisis, in a world where every year an estimated 1.2 million people are killed in road traffic crashes.

Global Health: Systems and Safety

India: Polio-Free and Looking Ahead at mHealth

During two days in February, 170 million children will be vaccinated for polio in India. And in the last two years, none of them have seen polio. India moves on from polio and forays into mHealth.

A Bot to Watch Over Me

By 2025, Japan will face a shortage of 37,700 care workers. Robots are starting to find their way to households and nursing homes to fill the gap.

'Virtually Able'

Japan’s average life expectancy was the highest in the world, at 83.7 years in 2015. But what’s the point of living longer if you are not happy? Can seniors find happiness in a virtual journey?

Can Tech Sustain a Super-Aged Japan?

Japan has the largest percentage of older people in the world, with 27.3 percent of their citizens 65 and older. It has turned to technologies from VR to robotics to solve challenges of super-aging.

World Tuberculosis Day

Targeting care to poor and developing communities reduces stigma and deters development of drug-resistant strains of TB. Can a new diagnostic test be the turning point in the fight against TB?