Issue

Global Health: Systems and Safety

Pulitzer Center grantees examine the quality and efficiency of healthcare infrastructure throughout the world, focusing on the need to provide affordable care, prevent future catastrophic outbreaks such as Ebola, rethink business models, and improve healthcare delivery through new diagnostic tools or mobile technology.

Special attention is paid to the healthcare systems in low-income countries where clinics in rural areas are few and far between, healthcare providers scarce, surgical treatment centers often non-existent—and where children under the age of five are 16 times more likely to die than those in high-income countries.

Our journalists also cover safety issues and injury-related deaths, including those caused by firearms, drowning, or car accidents. Our Roads Kill project features an interactive map with reports on road fatalities from around the world—an often neglected, yet preventable, global health crisis, in a world where every year an estimated 1.2 million people are killed in road traffic crashes.

Global Health: Systems and Safety

Roads Kill

From HIV/AIDS to malaria and tuberculosis, poor countries endure more than their share of health crises. Now they are stalked by a new nemesis on course to claim even more lives—highway fatalities.

Death Stalks Colombia's Unions

As Colombia struggles to free itself from a vortex of violence, union members, human rights activists and others still feel threatened by criminal elements––and their own government.

Gun Violence in Chicago: A Global Problem

As the discussion about tougher gun laws gains momentum in the U.S. after mass shootings in Colorado and Connecticut, Chicago is trapped in a daily cycle of gun violence.

Chicago and Guatemala: Too Young to Die

“Too Young to Die” is a long-term exploration of the tragedy gun violence exacts on Chicago’s streets. Although over 100 children and young people died in 2012, their deaths are often overshadowed.

Jailing the Mentally Ill

John Yang and Frank Carlson explore better solutions on how to treat the mentally ill, specifically ways that do not include imprisonment.

When BRCA Mutations Meet Complications

Hrafnhildur Sveinbjörnsdóttir had a double mastectomy after finding out she had a gene mutation linked to a high risk of breast cancer. But trying to avoid illness cost her her health.