Issue

Global Health: Systems and Safety

Pulitzer Center grantees examine the quality and efficiency of healthcare infrastructure throughout the world, focusing on the need to provide affordable care, prevent future catastrophic outbreaks such as Ebola, rethink business models, and improve healthcare delivery through new diagnostic tools or mobile technology.

Special attention is paid to the healthcare systems in low-income countries where clinics in rural areas are few and far between, healthcare providers scarce, surgical treatment centers often non-existent—and where children under the age of five are 16 times more likely to die than those in high-income countries.

Our journalists also cover safety issues and injury-related deaths, including those caused by firearms, drowning, or car accidents. Our Roads Kill project features an interactive map with reports on road fatalities from around the world—an often neglected, yet preventable, global health crisis, in a world where every year an estimated 1.2 million people are killed in road traffic crashes.

Global Health: Systems and Safety

An Odd Couple Print-Broadcast Marriage

Science magazine and PBS NewsHour have teamed up to cover HIV/AIDS in Russia for broadcast and print stories, which requires constant juggling of the distinct reporting needs of print and TV.

The Price of Health: TB Budget Gaps in Vietnam

Vietnam has less than 30 percent of the funding needed to fight tuberculosis. With only the most basic treatment programs, the country may soon be faced with the spread of a drug-resistant strain.

India's Hospital Crisis

Doctors have demanded fixes to India's public hospitals for years, but have been stifled by mismanagement.

South Africa: When the Drugs Don't Work

Tuberculosis is the leading cause of death in South Africa. Drug resistance is now so strong that patients are sent home to die. However, new drugs are being made available through trials or NGOs.

Honduras: "Aqui Vivimos"

"Honduras: Aqui Vivimos" ("Honduras: We Live Here") explores the social conditions—abject poverty, corruption, political disillusionment, and gang culture—that have made Honduras a violent country.