Issue

Global Health: Systems and Safety

Pulitzer Center grantees examine the quality and efficiency of healthcare infrastructure throughout the world, focusing on the need to provide affordable care, prevent future catastrophic outbreaks such as Ebola, rethink business models, and improve healthcare delivery through new diagnostic tools or mobile technology.

Special attention is paid to the healthcare systems in low-income countries where clinics in rural areas are few and far between, healthcare providers scarce, surgical treatment centers often non-existent—and where children under the age of five are 16 times more likely to die than those in high-income countries.

Our journalists also cover safety issues and injury-related deaths, including those caused by firearms, drowning, or car accidents. Our Roads Kill project features an interactive map with reports on road fatalities from around the world—an often neglected, yet preventable, global health crisis, in a world where every year an estimated 1.2 million people are killed in road traffic crashes.

Global Health: Systems and Safety

August 11, 2017

India: Health and the Healing Arts

Ambar Castillo

Indian health education practices get a face-lift from Gujarat-based non-governmental and activist organizations tapping into the power of personalized education efforts in slum communities.

August 06, 2017

Data in a Crisis

Amy Maxmen, Neil Brandvold

In the chaos of crisis and human displacement, aid organizations struggle to track, analyze and respond to information fast enough to provide help. Tech and data science is providing a solution.

July 28, 2017

Haiti's Sewage Solution

Rebecca Hersher

A plan to build sewage treatment plants all over Haiti after the 2010 earthquake has stalled, despite millions of dollars in international funding.

April 10, 2017

Nigeria's Unfolding Crisis

Leslie Roberts

Terrorized by Boko Haram for years, millions of people in northeastern Nigeria have fled to crowded camps and cities and are suffering from a deadly combination of severe malnutrition and infection.

When BRCA Mutations Meet Complications

Hrafnhildur Sveinbjörnsdóttir had a double mastectomy after finding out she had a gene mutation linked to a high risk of breast cancer. But trying to avoid illness cost her her health.

A Bot to Watch Over Me

By 2025, Japan will face a shortage of 37,700 care workers. Robots are starting to find their way to households and nursing homes to fill the gap.

'Virtually Able'

Japan’s average life expectancy was the highest in the world, at 83.7 years in 2015. But what’s the point of living longer if you are not happy? Can seniors find happiness in a virtual journey?

Can Tech Sustain a Super-Aged Japan?

Japan has the largest percentage of older people in the world, with 27.3 percent of their citizens 65 and older. It has turned to technologies from VR to robotics to solve challenges of super-aging.

Meet the Journalist: Sonia Shah

Tens of thousands of people fleeing bombs and beheadings are trapped in squalid refugee camps and ad hoc settlements across Greece. Will the country's tattered health system be able to prevent an epidemic?

This Week: Contagion That Travels by Plane

This week: How poor hygiene on planes leads to the spread of dangerous communicable diseases, how Sámi people are caught between a climate change solution and their own livelihoods, and how you can double your holiday gift to the Pulitzer Center.