Issue

Global Health: Reproductive Health

Most maternal deaths, due to complications during and following pregnancy and childbirth, are preventable, and great strides have been made in improving maternal health and reducing the number of deaths. Between 1990 and 2013, maternal mortality dropped by 45 percent, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). Yet, every day approximately 800 women still die from causes related to pregnancy and childbirth. In 2013, the number of maternal deaths worldwide was 289,000 women.

Maternal health impacts families, communities and societies with far-reaching effects, especially in developing countries, where 99 percent of all maternal deaths occur. The risk of maternal mortality is highest for girls under 15, many of whom have no access to contraception.

Our Pulitzer Center grantees have reported from many countries, including Indonesia, the Philippines, Guinea Bissau, India, Mexico, the Dominican Republic, Ethiopia and Nigeria. They are covering a wide range of issues—teenage pregnancy, child marriage, illegal abortion, religious beliefs and attitudes towards family planning, and poor infrastructure. Their stories highlight the severity of the reproductive health crisis as well as some of the many efforts made to give more women access to better and safer healthcare.

Global Health: Reproductive Health

April 09, 2015

Sierra Leone: Where Corruption Kills

Matt Hongoltz-Hetling, Michael G. Seamans

Forced to choose between corrupt government clinics and faith healers, Sierra Leone's pregnant women and their infants are dying in record numbers. One doctor may have the solution.

January 04, 2015

Teenage Pregnancy in the Dominican Republic

Jennifer Gonzalez, Luke Nozicka

As teen pregnancy rates are slowly decreasing in the United States, rates in the Dominican Republic are double the world average, with 1 of 10 teen girls becoming pregnant in 2013.

September 25, 2014

Saving Kenya’s Mothers

Paul Nevin, Adiba Khan

Kenya continues to lose 7,000 mothers to preventable deaths each year. If the solutions are known, why has there been so little progress in saving their lives?

July 14, 2014

Less Is More in Niger

Jennifer Koons

The rate of population growth exceeds economic growth in Niger where women have an average of seven children. Government officials hope family planning will become the best way forward.

The Life Equation

What if there were an algorithm for saving the most lives?

Meet Fred de Sam Lazaro

Fred de Sam Lazaro explains the source of declining birth rate in Brazil and how it could enhance women’s role in the society—a topic of his project “Brazil: Girl Power.”

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